Synthedelia: Psychedelic Electronic Music in the 1960s

1960s: Days of Rage


“‘Rock & roll is electronic music – because if you pull the plug, it stops.’ So says Louis ‘Cork’ Marcheschi of Fifty Foot Hose, whose sole album, Cauldron – a pioneering collision of abstract electronics and psychedelic rock originally released in 1967 – was reissued for the first time on vinyl at the end of 2017. Marcheschi’s remark is a reissue too, in a way. He originally made that assertion early in ’67 when he and guitarist David Blossom were drunkenly hatching the idea for Fifty Foot Hose, as a rock group that ‘really incorporated the concepts of electronic music not as sound effects but as a substantive part of the music.’ Fifty Foot Hose weren’t the only ’60s rockers who’d had this lightbulb moment. Although these bands were largely unaware of each other’s existence at the time, you could group Fifty Foot Hose among a confederacy of acid-era bands…

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Apocalypse Now (1979)/ Apocalypse Now Redux (2001) – Francis Ford Coppola

1960s: Days of Rage


Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epicwar film directed, produced, and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola. It was co-written by John Milius with narration written by Michael Herr. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne, and Dennis Hopper. The screenplay, written by Milius, adapts the story of Joseph Conrad‘s novella Heart of Darkness, changing its setting from late nineteenth-century Congo to the Vietnam War. It draws from Herr’s Dispatches and Werner Herzog‘s Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972). The film revolves around Captain Benjamin L. Willard (Sheen), who is on a secret mission to assassinate Colonel Kurtz, a renegade Army officer who is presumed insane. The film has been noted for the problems encountered while making it, chronicled in the documentary Hearts of Darkness:…

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Pink Floyd Under a Microscope, Plus a Classic Animals LP and More

By Jeff Burger

Pink Floyd Album by AlbumLongtime Pink Floyd member Richard Wright died a decade ago, and the group—whose other members have been feuding for years—disbanded in 2014. Interest in their music seems at least as intense now as it was when they were together, however, so the release of material from and about them continues unabated. In 2016, for example, the band issued a gargantuan box set, The Early Years, which focuses solely on their work from 1965 to 1972 and includes 11 CDs, eight Blu-ray discs, nine DVDs, five vinyl singles, and assorted memorabilia. (The eye-popping price tag: just under $500.) That same year, London’s Victoria and Albert Museum marked the 50th anniversary of Pink Floyd’s first single by announcing a major exhibition devoted to their work. Now, two new books cover the band’s recorded legacy.

Pink Floyd: Album by Album, a well-illustrated volume from prolific Toronto-based rock journalist Martin Popoff…

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