Kenny Wilson and Mick Pini live studio recordings from Germany, January 2020

Here are some studio recordings of my songs with me and Mick Pini recorded in Ichenhausen, Germany recently. Recorded at the lb-studio (Tonstudio) by ace engineer Tobias.

“Sugar Man” and “Ever Reaching Out For You” are songs I wrote in the mid 70s when I played in a duo with Mick. We haven’t played them together since then but it all came back to us. A real nostalgic moment. I think the songs still stand up and I am so glad I have returned them to my repertoire. Thanks to Mick and Tobias for all their help. Below is a video of our performance of “Sugar Man” at a gig in Birkenried.

Live studio recording January 2020 Ichenhausen, Germany

Blonde on Blonde – Bob Dylan (1966)

This has got to be one of my favourite albums of all time!!

1960s: Days of Rage


Blonde on Blonde is the seventh studio album by American singer-songwriterBob Dylan, released on June 20, 1966 by Columbia Records. Recording sessions began in New York in October 1965 with numerous backing musicians, including members of Dylan’s live backing band, the Hawks. Though sessions continued until January 1966, they yielded only one track that made it onto the final album—’One of Us Must Know (Sooner or Later)‘. At producer Bob Johnston‘s suggestion, Dylan, keyboardist Al Kooper, and guitarist Robbie Robertson moved to the CBS studios in Nashville, Tennessee. These sessions, augmented by some of Nashville’s top session musicians, were more fruitful, and in February and March all the remaining songs for the album were recorded. Blonde on Blonde completed the trilogy of rock albums that Dylan recorded in 1965 and 1966, starting with Bringing It All Back Home and Highway…

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Son House: The Lost King Of The Delta Blues

This is from a great blog I follow called 1960s:Days of Rage. I actually met Son House in 1967 at the De Montfort Hall, Leicester. I was 16. He was an amazing character who could still sing and play wonderfully!

I was at an open mic in Leicester last night and a friend of mine, Rhett Barrow, sang a Son House song. He did a great job! Then, this morning, I came upon this blog post. Fate has directed me back to an appreciation of Son House and his marvellous recordings!

1960s: Days of Rage


Intense is the one word that describes Son House (21 March 1902 – 19 October 1988)and his version of the blues. He was a major influence on Muddy Waters and Robert Johnson, like both of them, when Son sang the blues you had to believe him. Born Eddie James House Jr, his father played in the family brass band. House grew up on a plantation near Clarksdale. He was preaching in church by the time he was 15, as well as working a variety of jobs. He taught himself to play the guitar around 1923 and was soon playing house rent parties and local picnics. In 1928 he served time in the infamous Parchman Farm prison after which he worked with Charley Patton playing levee camps and country dances around Clarksdale, Mississippi. It was through Patton that Son House recorded for the first time. This was for Paramount Records…

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Kenny Wilson’s Song “Muggy Measures” now on Spotify and Online Music Stores

“Muggy Measures” by Kenny Wilson. Just released!

I wrote this song a little while ago as part of the Vitallion III project with Mick Smith and Steve Cartwright. It has received a lot of interest from many of Muggy’s descendants and admirers so I have decided to put it on the internet so people can easily access it. Thanks to you all for the interest, it is very encouraging! It is a great feeling when your work has made a positive impact on others.

Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere – Neil Young & Crazy Horse (1969)

1960s: Days of Rage


“Neil Young’s music has been a unique landscape of musical terrain across five decades. His catalog is large and for those unfamiliar, it can loom unapproachable. As with most things, it’s easy to start at the beginning. His 1969 self-titled debut is a bright start—a collection of songs with many colors, shapes, and textures mimicking the geometric, psychedelic portrait of Young on the LP’s cover. If you’re familiar with any other Neil Young, whether or not it’s within the Buffalo Springfield or CSNY universes, listening to it is like reading a beloved author’s lesser known work. It’s not as tight or fully realized, but it provides a groundwork of expectations to launch Neil Young as a solo artist. He clearly had a lot on his mind as his first two solo records were released in 1969. His sophomore LP and first with his famous backing band Crazy Horse, Everybody Knows…

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