Bob Dylan’s Masterpiece, “Blood on the Tracks,” Is Still Hard to Find | The New Yorker

By Alex Ross (New Yorker Magazine)

In September, 1974, Bob Dylan spent four days in the old Studio A, his favorite recording haunt in Manhattan, and emerged with the greatest, darkest album of his career. It is a ten-song study in romantic devastation, as beautiful as it is bleak, worthy of comparison with Schubert’s “Winterreise.” Yet the record in question—“Blood on the Tracks”—has never officially seen the light of day. The Columbia label released an album with that title in January, 1975, but Dylan had reworked five of the songs in last-minute sessions in Minnesota, resulting in a substantial change of tone. Mournfulness and wistfulness gave way to a feisty, festive air. According to Andy Gill and Kevin Odegard, the authors of the book “A Simple Twist of Fate: Bob Dylan and the Making of ‘Blood on the Tracks,’ ” from 2004, Dylan feared a commercial failure. The revised “Blood” sold extremely well, reaching the top of the Billboard album chart, and it ended talk of Dylan’s creative decline. It was not, however, the masterwork of melancholy that he created in Studio A.

For decades, the first “Blood” circulated on a bootleg called the New York Sessions. The compact disc that I picked up in a basement Greenwich Village store had a pleasant overlay of vinyl noise—the result of a transfer from a test pressing. Although several of the tracks have shown up in Columbia’s long-running Bootleg Series, the perennial absence of the full album has made fans wonder whether Dylan is wary of revisiting a turbulent time of his life, when his first marriage, to Sara Lownds, was dissolving. Dylan has denied that “Blood” is autobiographical; in his memoir, “Chronicles: Volume One,” he suggests that the songs were based on Chekhov. Artists tend to dislike personal readings of their most personal work.

Last month, Columbia issued “More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 14.” Available both as a single-disk compilation and as a six-CD “deluxe edition,” it is both more and less than what Dylan obsessives have been tiresomely clamoring for. The logical move would have been to include the entire album in its initial guise. Yet the single disk gives you only two of the test-pressing tracks, alongside some admittedly riveting outtakes. The box set has all of the discarded tracks, but they are scattered through a complete chronological survey of the four days of sessions—five and a half hours of Dylan at the height of his powers. You will have to study the track listings to assemble the original record. The elusiveness of “Blood on the Tracks” has been integral to its allure, and so it remains.

The Morgan Library, which owns the autograph manuscript of “Winterreise,” also possesses a five-inch-by-three-inch red spiral notebook in which Dylan wrote down lyrics for “Blood on the Tracks.” A hardback book included with Columbia’s “deluxe edition” reproduces forty pages of sketches. Some of them are sung more or less as written on both incarnations of the album:

He woke up, the room was bare
He could didn’t see her anywhere
He told himself he didn’t care,
pushed the window open wide
Then felt an emptiness inside
to which he just could not relate
Brought on by a Simple Twist of Fate

Other lyrics never saw the light of day, and are brutally confessional: “Doomed (led) by a heart that wanders astray / Trapped by a brain that I can’t throw away . . . Was it really 12 years ago, well, it seems like just the other day . . . And it’s Breaking me up with only myself to blame.”

Clichés about heartbreak feeding genius fail to explain the singular potency of “Blood on the Tracks.” The rawness of feeling is certainly there, but it is joined to meticulous craftsmanship in the working-out of words and music. The notebook shows constant, obsessive revision—a sort of perfectionism of disaster. “Idiot Wind,” the extended primal scream at the heart of the album, is seen in drafts so crowded with marginal additions that they are hardly legible. Often Dylan doesn’t cross things out, instead superimposing alternatives:

The priest wore black on the seventh day and waltzed around on a tilted floor
stepped all over me
After you (came down on me) you said you never saw my face before
did me in
done
(After you stepped all over my head, you said ya never wanted to see my face no more)
I BEG YOUR PARDON MADAM
(thru the circles round your eyes)
IDIOT WIND – BLOWIN EVERY TIME YOU MOVE YOUR JAW
FROM THE GRAND COOLIE DAM TO THE MARDI GRAS
(blowing thru the hot and dusty skies)

Such collisions of hallucinatory images and dour realism—the waltzing priest, the marital argument—are common in Dylan’s work, yet here the literary touches seem less an artful device than a form of extreme emphasis. What’s more, the writing process is open-ended: images are shuffled around through successive drafts and, later, through successive takes in the studio. That priest waltzes on a tilted floor; then he waltzes while a building burns; then he sits stone-faced. The wind blows from the Grand Coulee Dam to the Mardi Gras, then to the Capitol.

The music that Dylan wrote for these lyrics has a chilly, clammy air. His guitar is in open-E tuning, meaning that all six strings of the guitar are tuned to notes of the E-major triad: E, B, E, G#, B, E. As a result, the tonic chord rings rich and bright. But each verse begins with a jarring A-minor chord, which tends to land awkwardly. The middle note easily strays off center, souring the sound. Occasionally, a stray F-sharp bleeds through, adding a Romantic tinge. The unwieldiness of the progression is at one with the fraught atmosphere of the text.

The emotional violence is troubling. The word “idiot” is flung down twelve times. Some lines are openly assaultive: “One day you’ll be in the ditch, flies buzzing around your eyes, / Blood on your saddle.” Here, Dylan’s original approach makes a substantial difference. He made four complete takes in New York, plus several rehearsals and false starts. Each time, he has only a quiet bass guitar backing him. (A ghostly organ was later overdubbed.) The tempo is slow, the delivery subdued. All this is at odds with the song’s smoldering rage, and the contradiction gets resolved in the final chorus, where Dylan shifts from the second person to the first-person plural: “Idiot wind, blowing through the buttons of our coats / Blowing through the letters that we wrote . . . We’re idiots, babe, it’s a wonder we can even feed ourselves.”

Many Dylanists will disagree with me—the second “Blood” has eloquent defenders—but to my ears the later version, recorded with six pick-up musicians in Minnesota, cuts out much of the complexity. Mannerisms overtake the singer’s delivery. “Idiot” becomes “yidiot,” and a goofy pirate yowl periodically intrudes: “I woke up on the roadside, daydreaming about the way things sometimes aaahhhhhrrrre.” (When he does this on one of the New York takes, Tony Brown, the bass player, laughs out loud.) The admission of shared responsibility at the end doesn’t register: you’re carried away by the momentum of the band.

All through the New York sessions, you hear a persistent downward tug in the voice, a grimace of regret. Even the album’s livelier numbers, such as “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go,” can be wrenched into the abyss; on one take, the tempo drastically slows, giving an almost tragic tinge to a line like “I’ve only known careless love.” The potential downside is a tendency toward relentlessness: one piece after another in the key of E, spiralling through love and loss. The final album offers more variety. The Minnesota band gives a rollicking energy to the cinematic yarn of “Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts.” Arguably, that song suffers under the austere New York style, though I love it anyway.

Ultimately, the long-running debate over the competing incarnations of “Blood on the Tracks” misses the point of what makes this artist so infinitely interesting, at least for some of us. Jeff Slate, who wrote liner notes for “More Blood, More Tracks,” observes that Dylan’s work is always in flux. The process that is documented on these eighty-seven tracks is not one of looking for the “right” take; it’s the beginning of an endless sequence of variations, which are still unfolding on his Never-Ending Tour. In an article from 1999, I notated some of Dylan’s live revisions of “Simple Twist of Fate.” The “More Blood” book reproduces alternate lyrics that were written on stationery from the Hotel Drei Könige am Rhein, in Basel. Dylan is still at it. The other night, in Durham, North Carolina, he sang:

He woke up and she was gone
He didn’t see nothing but the dawn
Got out of bed and put his shoes back on
Then he pushed back the blinds
Found a note she left behind
What’d it say? It said you should have met me back in ‘58
We could have avoided this, ah, little simple twist of fate.

To assemble the original “Blood on the Tracks” from the eighty-seven takes on “More Blood, More Tracks,” select tracks 69 (CD 5, No. 3), 71 (CD 5, No. 5), 34 (CD 3, No. 3), 76 (CD 5, No. 10), 48 (CD 4, No. 2), 16 (CD 2, No. 5), 11 (CD 1, No. 11), 59 (CD 4, No. 13), 46 (CD 3, No. 15), and 58 (CD 4, No. 12).

Source: Bob Dylan’s Masterpiece, “Blood on the Tracks,” Is Still Hard to Find | The New Yorker

Bob Dylan’s First Day with “Tangled Up in Blue” | The New Yorker

The  New York sessions for Bob Dylan’s 1975 album, “Blood on the Tracks,” have always been ground zero for Dylan’s reputation as a cipher and a curmudgeon in the recording studio, intent on speeding through the proceedings and capturing lightning in a bottle, quality control be damned. As the story has been told—mostly by musicians who no doubt felt that they didn’t get a fair shake during the biggest moment of their careers—Dylan started sessions for “Blood on the Tracks” on September 16, 1974, on Rosh Hashanah, with a band of New York session “cats” who couldn’t hear what Dylan was doing on songs that he hadn’t bothered to teach them. He waved them off, one by one, as the day wore on, essentially firing them before they had a chance to prove themselves. The problem is, it simply isn’t true.

As the author of the liner notes for “More Blood, More Tracks,” the latest entry in Dylan’s “Bootleg Series,” I was one of the first people to hear the raw session tapes in chronological order. I listened while perusing Dylan’s fabled “red notebook,” in which he’d written the lyrics to the ten songs on “Blood on the Tracks” in his tiny, precise scrawl. What I quickly realized turned the legend upside down: Dylan entered the studio early on the sixteenth, long before any of the session musicians had arrived, intent on cutting an acoustic album—a sort of “Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” for the mid-seventies. Contrary to most accounts, Dylan was supremely prepared, and immediately went about delivering aching versions of some of the best—and most intimate—songs that he had ever written. In the era of Neil Young and Joni Mitchell and so many others unjustly or unfortunately dubbed “the New Dylan,” and after a clutch of albums that fans had found less than satisfying, Dylan was throwing down the gauntlet, showing himself once again to be the master singer-songwriter and performer.

By the time the musicians who’d been hired to back Dylan arrived that afternoon, he had already cut eleven songs. Dylan would record another fifteen that day—including five takes of “Idiot Wind,” alone again, save for the bassist Tony Brown—for a total of thirty-six, an epic amount by any standard. But it’s clear as you listen that instead of things getting better as the sessions progressed, with the musicians finding their groove with Dylan, the atmosphere in the room degenerated. Most interesting, while Dylan gamely puts the band through their paces on the seemingly easy blues of “Call Letter Blues” and “Meet Me in the Morning” (after attempts at “Simple Twist of Fate” failed miserably), he never lets them near what he surely senses must be his latest masterpiece: “Tangled Up in Blue.” And so, on the afternoon of September 17th, Dylan steps up to the microphone and delivers a hushed, intense, and powerfully intimate version of that song, accompanied only by Brown on bass.

There’s a plaintiveness in that very first version of “Tangled Up in Blue” that’s unusual. It’s the earliest version we have of the now-familiar tale—of the star-crossed couple and their travels and travails, that jumps from the first to third person and back again—and while Dylan doesn’t necessarily sound tentative, the way he often did on “The Cutting Edge: 1965-1966,” the “Bootleg Series” entry that chronicled his “thin wild mercury music” years, he does seem more vulnerable than he ever had before, or ever would be again. “There’s a lot of honesty there,” Jeff Burger, the author of “Dylan on Dylan,” said. “It’s raw and heartfelt, with less posing than he’d done on some of his earlier songs. Of course, many great songs had come before, like ‘Desolation Row’ and so many others, but he was showing off his way with words and painting a picture of another world, not necessarily telling a whole lot about himself. But here he really gets down to the personal, even if it isn’t completely direct.”

While he was writing the songs for “Blood on the Tracks,” Dylan had taken up painting classes with the New York artist Norman Raeben. By all accounts, Raeben was a taskmaster, but he imparted in his students a sense both that life itself was the art, with their creations being merely the by-product of that experience, and, significantly for Dylan, that past, present, and future could all coexist in their work. “He put my mind and my hand and my eye together, in a way that allowed me to do consciously what I unconsciously felt,” Dylan told Rolling Stone in 1978, of Raeben’s influence on his songwriting approach.

While Dylan is known to endlessly and brutally edit his lyrics until the very last minute in the studio, and the epic “Idiot Wind” transformed in the course of the “Blood on the Tracks” sessions, “Tangled Up in Blue” is the one song in Dylan’s vast catalogue that he has never seemed to be finished with. There are eight takes from the New York sessions, and the slightest lyrical change, shift in tempo, or variation in delivery causes the song to reveal itself in unexpected ways. When Dylan launches into take two of the song, it’s bouncy, with punchy vocals and organ flourishes, making it, already, a different tale altogether. Further takes seem to split the difference between dark and light. By the time Dylan and Brown attempt the song for the last time in New York, in a remarkable version recorded at the eleventh hour of those sessions, Dylan has seemingly wrung all he can out of “Tangled Up in Blue.”

Still, Dylan would revisit the song just three months later—this time in Minneapolis—in the version that we would all come to love and obsess over. His voice was already transformed, more akin to the carnival-barker delivery that he’d employ on 1975’s “Desire” and the Rolling Thunder Review tour. The version Dylan performed less than a year later on that tour was yet again vastly reworked, and he would continue tinkering with it over the years. A decade later, in 1984, on the album “Real Live,” Dylan felt he’d finally found the song he’d been looking for. “On ‘Real Live’ it is more like it should have been,” Dylan told Rolling Stone in 1985. “I was never really happy with it. I guess I was just trying to make it like a painting where you can see the different parts, but then you also see the whole of it. With that particular song, that’s what I was trying to do . . . with the concept of time, and the way the characters change from the first person to the third person, and you’re never quite sure if the third person is talking or the first person is talking. But as you look at the whole thing it really doesn’t matter. On ‘Real Live,’ the imagery is better and more the way I would have liked it than on the original recording.”

Dylan has performed “Tangled Up in Blue” 1,546 times during his Never Ending Tour, which began in 1988 and is still going. Like any good Dylan obsessive, I’ve seen many of those performances. It’s a guilty pleasure of Dylanologists to trainspot the tweaks—both large and small—that Dylan makes to the lyrics from year to year, or sometimes from night to night. Still, when I was presented with Dylan’s latest revision, written in his own hand—which is part of the “Mondo Scripto” exhibition of his art currently on display at the Halcyon Gallery in London— it was like seeing an old, dear friend, whom you know intimately, but who’s no doubt changed and grown over the years, adapting with the times.

Tangled Up in Blue v 13 Page 1 - Google Chrome 01_11_2018 13_14_17 (2)Tangled Up in Blue v 13 Page 2 - Google Chrome 01_11_2018 13_16_54 (2)

Fans who have seen Dylan in concert recently will recognize some of the changes, of how “he let the law take its course” has taken the place of using “a little too much force,” or how instead of “fishing outside Delacroix,” “everybody’d gone somewhere.” Of course, the past is still close behind, “following me like a shadow that couldn’t get out of my mind / sticking like glue / Tangled up in blue,” but she isn’t working in a topless bar anymore but at the Moonlight Lounge, “where men put money in her hand.” “There’s always been a certain truth about money that I never did understand,” this new version of Dylan’s classic tells us. “You put things to bed and you’ll call it a day / Sometimes you go along for the ride / You pick your brains and you bury the hatchet / Then you walk on the wild side / Towns are ruined and cities burns and images disappear / Weep with all of your heart if you would / I too cried a tear / Nothing you can do / If you’re tangled up in blue.” It recasts the song in the spirit of our times, in the same way the original was so much a product of the Vietnam and Watergate era.

While researching the sessions for “Blood on the Tracks,” I spoke to the writer Larry (Ratso) Sloman, who got to know Dylan around the time and has remained friends with him ever since. He told me a fascinating story of an artist who is perhaps oblivious to how seriously we all take him, but also at peace with his creative process. “I was around during the sessions for ‘Infidels,’ and I fell in love with the song ‘Blind Willie McTell,’ ” Sloman said, referring to a song that’s considered one of Dylan’s best but didn’t find a home on a release until the first volume of his “Bootleg Series,” in 1991. “When the album was finished, Bob called me up and asked me if I wanted to come over to hear it. He played it for me, but no ‘Blind Willie McTell.’ I asked him, ‘What gives, Bob? Where’s ‘Blind Willie McTell?’ And, without missing a beat, he goes, ‘It’s no big deal, Ratso. It’s just an album. I’ve made twenty-two. And I’ll make more.’ ”

Unlike, say, Paul Simon, a presenter who toils over his records, perfecting every nuance until everything is just so, Dylan is restless, visceral, mercurial, always seemingly on the way to his next creation. “More Blood, More Tracks,” and especially its centerpiece, the constantly evolving, shifting, changing “Tangled Up in Blue,” is pure Dylan, a portrait of an artist who never seems to tire of the chase.

“Tangled Up in Blue” copyright © 1974 by Ram’s Horn Music, renewed in 2002 by Ram’s Horn Music. Additional lyrics copyright © 2018 Ram’s Horn Music. Courtesy of the MondoScripto exhibit at the Halcyon Gallery, London.

  • Jeff Slate is a New York City-based songwriter and music journalist. He has written liner notes for Bob Dylan, the Beatles, and others, and is the co-author of “The Authorized Roy Orbison.”

Source: Bob Dylan’s First Day with “Tangled Up in Blue” | The New Yorker

The Musicians’ Olympus: Ric Grech (bass / violin)

Ric Grech (bass / violin)


BANDS:

BAND PERIOD DETAILS
The Berkeley Squares  
Exciters  
The Farinas [1965-1966]
The Roaring Sixties  
Family [1967-May 69] 4 albums + 2 compilations
Blind Faith [May 69-Aug 69] 2 albums
Airforce [Jan 70-May 70] 1 album + 1 compilation
John Mayall Band [Jun 70] (1 gig)
Traffic [Aug 70-Dec 71] 2 albums + 2 compilations
Eric Clapton & The Palpitations [Jan 73] (2 gigs) 2 albums + 4 compilations
The Crickets [1973-1974] 4 albums
Johnny Rivers Band [1973-1974]
Charge [1974]
Ric Grech Band   1 compilation
KGB [1975] 1 album
Ric Grech Band (again) [Dec 75-Jun 76]
Square Dancing Machine [Jun 76-1976]
Denny Laine Band [1983-1984]

BIOGRAPHY:

Ric Grech

Very fine bassist as well as violin player, I always liked his style since I first heard him in the Blind Faith album. I felt very sad when I read of his sad death, he always seemed so young, with his pretty face. Ric Grech was born Richard Roman Grech on November 1st, 1946, in Bordeaux, France, but grew up in Leicester, England. He died on March 17th, 1990 at Gwendolen Road Hospital, Leicester. He suffered a cerebral haemorrhage, and this was followed by a combined kidney and liver failure. He was 43, too sad. 😦

One note: you´ll see him credited in albums as Rick Grech, even as Rich Grech, but my guess is that the most accurate name he used is Ric Grech.


THE BERKELEY SQUARES


Berkeley Squares was a band from Leicester, formed by Martin Osborn. This was Ric Grech first band, and Martin taught Ric to play guitar as he originally came to music via violin and was first violinist in the Leicester Youth Orchestra for a while:

THE BERKELEY SQUARES #?
?
Martin Osborn
guitar
+ others unknown to me. Help!

If someone can help with additional info, it would be very welcomed.


OTHER EARLY BANDS…


Roger Chapman and Ric Grech played in a band with guitarist Stuart Brown, before they went to Farinas. Does anybody know the band name or more details, please? Maybe the band name was Exciters?

He also formed a band with brothers Ray Martinez (guitar) and Paul Martinez (bass), but again, can´t find more info.


THE FARINAS


This band was the seed for Family group. Also known as Jim King And The Farinas, it was formed by Jim King and guitarist Charlie Whitney in 1962. Ric Grech joined them in 1965:

THE FARINAS #2
1965-1966
Charlie Whitney
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Jim King
sax
Harry Overnall
drums

They played good strong R&B stuff.

In 1966, singer Roger Chapman joined The Farinas:

THE FARINAS #3
1966
Roger Chapman
vocals
Charlie Whitney
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Jim King
sax
Harry Overnall
drums
The Roaring Sixtiesê
The Roaring Sixtiesê
The Roaring Sixtiesê
The Roaring Sixtiesê
The Roaring Sixtiesê

With Chapman, they also started to play Sam & Dave soul covers. But they soon changed their name to The Roaring Sixties.

Other info on members of The Farinas (I know up to 6 members)
To be covered (3): Roger Chapman, Jim King, Charlie Whitney

THE ROARING SIXTIES


The Roaring Sixties was the new name for The Farinas in 1966:

THE ROARING SIXTIES #1
1966
êThe Farinas
êThe Farinas
êThe Farinas
êThe Farinas
êThe Farinas
Roger Chapman
vocals
Charlie Whitney
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Jim King
sax
Harry Overnall
drums
Familyê
Familyê
Familyê
Familyê

In mid 1967, they changed their name again to The Family, then changing their drummer.

Other info on members of The Roaring Sixties (I know up to 5 members)
To be covered (3): Roger Chapman, Jim King, Charlie Whitney

FAMILY


Family

Family

Originall called The Family (although they soon dropped the ´The´ part of the name) at the suggestion of Kim Fowley, this was their first lineup, in mid 1967:

FAMILY #1
1967-May 69
êThe Roaring Sixties
êThe Roaring Sixties
êThe Roaring Sixties
êThe Roaring Sixties
Roger Chapman
vocals
Charlie Whitney
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass, violin, vocals
Jim King
sax
Rob Townsend
drums
Blind Faithê

They recorded their first single, ´Scene Through The Eye Of A Lens / Gypsy woman´ in October 1967, with no success.

Their first album, Music in a doll´s house, was produced by Traffic guitarist, Dave Mason. At the same time, the band backed Dave Mason in the B-side of his first single.

After their second album, Family entertainment, Ric surprised everybody when he left the band in the middle of a tour in May 1969, to join the first supergroup ever, Blind Faith.

Family in 1968 – from left ro right: Ric Grech, Rob Townshend, Charlie Whitney, Roger Chapman, Jim King

Family – from left ro right: Ric Grech, Charlie Whitney, Rob Townshend, Jim King, Roger Chapman

Other info on members of Family (I know up to 10 members)
Old pages (1): Jim Cregan
To be covered (8): Tony Ashton, Roger Chapman, Jim King, Poli Palmer, Rob Townsend, John Weider, John Wetton, Charlie Whitney

BLIND FAITH


Blind Faith – from left to right Steve Winwood, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Ginger Baker

With these talents together, the less-known boy was Ric Grech, who was asked to leave Family and join Blind Faith in May 1969:

BLIND FAITH #2
May 69-Aug 69
êFamily
Steve Winwood
keyboards, vocals
Eric Clapton
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass, violin
Ginger Baker
drums

They released only one album, Blind Faith, published in August 1969. I like it, although I must reckon it has some not-very fortunate tracks. But there are some others that were converted into real classics, like ´Presence of the Lord´ or ´Can’t find my way home´. It also includes a Buddy Holly rendition, ´Well all right´ (years later covered by Santana). We can find a beautiful violin solo by Ric in the song ´Sea of joy´. There´s a deluxe edition as 2CD with 5 unreleased tracks and 4 long jams as a trio (still without Ric, but with percussionist Guy Warren from Ghana, a close friend of Ginger Baker).

They made their live debut as the main attraction in a huge concert in Hyde Park in June 1969, who also was attended by ´new´ bands like King Crimson. This was followed by a Scandinavian tour in July 1969, before moving to the States for another tour.

The story of this band was really short, as it seems that Eric Clapton´s original idea was quickly abandoned for a humble stay as sideman in Delaney & Bonnie’s band (the opening band for Blind Faith), far from stardom. They simply disbanded in August 1969 after their last gig. After a while, all but Clapton stayed together under Ginger Baker´s Airforce name.

Blind Faith – from left to right Steve Winwood, Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech

Other info on members of Blind Faith (I know up to 4 members)
To be covered (3): Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood

UNNAMED BAND


Soon after Blind Faith´s separation, Clapton and some friends recorded some sessions at Olympic Studios in London, but none from it was ever released. Some of the musicians were:

UNNAMED BAND #1
1970
Eric Clapton
guitar
George Harrison †
guitar
Denny Laine
guitar
Trevor Burton
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass

Laine and Burton were at this time in the band Balls. And Clapton finally joined permanently to Delaney & Bonnie. It was also published in the press in August 1970 that Balls were recording 12 tracks for an album that was never released, and Ric Grech played in some of those tracks, but they´re maybe speaking of these same sessions.

I guess these sessions included the tracks ´Spending All My Days´ and ´Exchange And Mart´, recorded in October 1969 by Ric with George Harrison, Trevor Burton and Denny Laine. These two tracks appear as bonus tracks in a rare German reissue of the Blind Faith album.

Other info on members of Unnamed Band (I know up to 5 members)
Old pages (1): Denny Laine
To be covered (3): Trevor Burton, Eric Clapton, George Harrison

GINGER BAKER´S AIRFORCE


This free-form outfit was assembled by Ginger Baker. The list of musicians wasn’t stable, in the jazz tradition. They started their short career in January 1970.

They soon released their first album, Airforce, with this personnel:

AIRFORCE #1
Jan 70
êBlind Faith
êBlind Faith
êBlind Faith
Jeanette Jacobs †
vocals
Denny Laine
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Steve Winwood
keyboards
Graham Bond †
keyboards, sax
Harold McNair †
flute, sax
Chris Wood †
sax, flute
Remi Kabaka
percussion
Ginger Baker
drums
Phil Seamen †
drums
Trafficê

With some other guests, like Bud Beadle (sax) and Steve Gregory (flute, sax) (later both in Gonzalez), Colin Gibson (bass), all of them were to join the band later.

In February 1970, Winwood leaves the band to reform Traffic again (where Chris Wood soon would join).

This is a slightly different lineup for Airforce from March to May 1970, when Steve Winwood had already left:

AIRFORCE #2
Mar 70-May 70
Jeanette Jacobs †
vocals
Denny Laine
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Graham Bond †
keyboards, sax
Harold McNair †
flute, sax
Chris Wood †
sax, flute
Remi Kabaka
percussion
Ginger Baker
drums
Phil Seamen †
drums
Trafficê

This is a enlarged lineup for Airforce in May 1970:

AIRFORCE #?
May 70
Jeanette Jacobs
vocals
Eleanor Barooshian
vocals
Denny Laine
guitar
Trevor Burton
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Graham Bond †
keyboards, sax
Harold McNair †
flute, sax
Bud Beadle
sax
Steve Gregory
sax
Remi Kabaka
percussion
Ginger Baker
drums
Phil Seamen †
drums
Alan White
drums
Trafficê

And then, Ric Grech left to join Traffic in August 1970.

Other info on members of Airforce (I know up to 21 members)
Already covered (2): Speedy AcquayeAliki Ashman
Old pages (2): Colin GibsonDenny Laine
To be covered (16): Ginger Baker, Eleanor Barooshian, Bud Beadle, Graham Bond, Trevor Burton, Kenny Craddock, Steve Gregory, Joni Haastrup, Jeanette Jacobs, Remi Kabaka, Harold McNair, Phil Seamen, Diane Stewart, Alan White, Steve Winwood, Chris Wood

JOHN MAYALL BAND


In June 1970, John Mayall was to play at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music. But, not having a stable band at the time, he asked some of his old friends to play with him. See the surprising one-off lineup! Peter Green, not long ago leaving Fleetwood Mac, bassist Ric Grech, and drummer Aynsley Dunbar! WOW!

JOHN MAYALL BAND #?
Jun 70
John Mayall
vocals, harmonica, keyboards, guitar
Peter Green
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Aynsley Dunbar
drums
Other info on members of John Mayall Band (I know up to 88 members)
Already covered (4): Davy GrahamKeef HartleyDick Heckstall-SmithChris Mercer
Old pages (6): Rick BrownAynsley DunbarPeter GreenJimmy McCullochTony ReevesMicky Waller
To be covered (77): Colin Allen, Johnny Almond, Rocky Athas, Ronnie Barron, Jack Bruce, Warren Bryant, Tom Canning, Eric Clapton, Fred Clark, Rick Cortes, Jay Davenport, Roger Dean, Alex Dmochowski, Tim Drummond, Terry Edmunds, Mick Fleetwood, Hughie Flint, Andy Fraser, Mike Gardner, Victor Gaskin, John Gilbey, Don ´Sugarcane´ Harris, High Tide Harris, Martin Hart, Bobby Haynes,… up to 77 musicians.

TRAFFIC


Ric Grech rejoined his colleagues Steve Winwood and Chris Wood in Traffic, in August 1970:

TRAFFIC #3
Aug 70-May 71
êAirforce
Steve Winwood
keyboards, vocals, guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Chris Wood †
sax, flute
Jim Capaldi †
drums, vocals

They wrote the music for a film called Nevertheless, but the film was never done.

In May 1971, they enrich Traffic with 3 more members:

TRAFFIC #4
May 71-1971
êAirforce
Steve Winwood
keyboards, vocals, guitar
Dave Mason
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Chris Wood †
sax, flute
Rebop Kwaku Baah †
percussion
Jim Capaldi †
drums, vocals
Jim Gordon
drums

They released a live album, Welcome to the canteen. I must say that it’s not really credited to Traffic, but to the names of the 7 musicians, but no doubt it’s a Traffic album. I love this album, although it lacks a very bad sound. It contains fantastic performances, and some songs from Winwood’s former band, Spencer Davis Group. I hope someday it will be remastered or enhanced, it deserves the task!

Soon after this album, Dave Mason leaves the band again.

Traffic – from left to right: Chris Wood, Ric Grech, Jim Gordon, Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Steve Winwood

During 1971, Traffic becomes a sextet with Dave Mason´s departure:

TRAFFIC #5
1971-Dec 71
Steve Winwood
keyboards, vocals, guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Chris Wood †
sax, flute
Rebop Kwaku Baah †
percussion
Jim Capaldi †
drums, vocals
Jim Gordon
drums

The new lineup released another album, The low spark of high heeled boys. I like the song ´Rainmaker´ a lot.

But in December 1971, Ric and Jim Gordon leave the band.

Other info on members of Traffic (I know up to 14 members)
To be covered (13): Rebop Kwaku Baah, Barry Beckett, Randall Bramblett, Jim Capaldi, Rosko Gee, Jim Gordon, Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Dave Mason, Mike McEvoy, Walfredo Reyes Jr, Steve Winwood, Chris Wood

ERIC CLAPTON BAND (aka THE PALPITATIONS)


from left to right: Wood, Grech, Clapton, Townshend

Due to his problems with drug addiction, Eric Clapton had disappeared from musical scene since 1971. Now it was 1973, and his friend Pete Townshend convinced him to come back to music. To encourage him, Pete Townshend brought some old Eric friends to help him feel comfortable. The band was funnily called The Palpitations, because of the nervous state all they shared for if Eric finally didn’t appear to play:

ERIC CLAPTON BAND #?
Jan 73
êFaces
êThe Who
êTraffic
êTraffic
êTraffic
Eric Clapton
vocals, guitar
Ron Wood
guitar
Pete Townshend
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Steve Winwood
keyboards, vocals
Rebop Kwaku Baah †
percussion
Jim Capaldi †
drums
Jim Karstein
drums
Facesê
The Whoê
Trafficê
Trafficê
Trafficê

They played together for a week, preparing the two concerts, to be made on January 13, 1973. A live album was released in September 1973 from those concerts, but it lacked a poor sound and even a poorer selection of tracks (only 6 tracks). It was a sad thing after all the interest they all took on succeed. But … this has been solved after 15 years. Now there is a extended edition from those concerts, the sound has been remastered (and incredibly enhanced!), and now we haven´t 6, but 14 tracks!!! A superb album. I loved the original in spite of all, but this one is really fantastic!!

from left to right: Ronnie Wood, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech and Pete Townshendfrom left to right: Grech, Wood, Townshend, Clapton, Capaldi

Other info on members of Eric Clapton Band (I know up to 74 members)
Already covered (3): Dave BronzeDonald ´Duck´ DunnTim Renwick
Old pages (9): Gary BrookerLaura CreamerMichael KamenKatie KissoonMarcy LevyShaun MurphyJamie OldakerHenry SpinettiChris Stainton
To be covered (61): Rebop Kwaku Baah, Doyle Bramhall II, Randy Brecker, Jim Capaldi, Tim Carmon, Chyna, Eric Clapton, Alan Clark, Simon Clarke, Phil Collins, Ray Cooper, Kenneth Crouch, Ronnie Cuber, Paulinho Da Costa, Alan Darby, David Delhomme, Nathan East, Yvonne Elliman, Andy Fairweather Low, Steve Ferrone, Gina Foster, Steve Gadd, Roger Hawkins, Richie Hayward, Charlean Hines,… up to 61 musicians.

THE CRICKETS


This was the band for rock’n’roll pioneer Buddy Holly. He died in 1959, but his band is still alive and rockin’ today. Around 1973, Ric Grech joined them:

THE CRICKETS #?
1973
Sonny Curtis
guitar, vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Glen D Hardin
piano
Jerry Allison
drums

But before the tour was started, Ric Grech convinced great guitarist Albert Lee to join The Crickets:

THE CRICKETS #?
1973-May 74
Sonny Curtis
guitar, vocals
Albert Lee
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Glen D Hardin
piano
Jerry Allison
drums

Albert Lee spent until May 1974 with them, recording three albums, as far as I know.

Other info on members of The Crickets (I know up to 13 members)
To be covered (2): Glen D Hardin, Albert Lee

JOHNNY RIVERS BAND


This was the Johnny Rivers Boogie Band in September 1973:

JOHNNY RIVERS BAND #?
1973
Johnny Rivers
vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Tony Ashton †
keyboards
Dave Kelper

And this was the lineup of the Johnny Rivers Boogie Band that played in Spain in September 1974:

JOHNNY RIVERS BAND #?
1974
Johnny Rivers
vocals
Ric Grech †
bass
Zoot Money
keyboards
Patrick Doheny
Dave Kelper
Other info on members of Johnny Rivers Band (I know up to 8 members)
To be covered (4): Tony Ashton, Mickey Jones, Zoot Money, John York

CHARGE


This was a project by Ian Green. They released a self-titled album, Charge in 1974, and assembled a different lineup for a few gigs. I can´t find proper info about the complete lineups, but Ric Grech played here, although he doesn´t appear in the album:

CHARGE #?
1974
Rosetta Hightower
vocals
Ric Grech †
bass, violin, guitar
Ian Green
keyboards
+ others unknown to me. Help!

Please, any info about this band would be very welcomed!

Other info on members of Charge (I know up to 10 members)
To be covered (9): Andy Dalby, Smiley De Jones, Ian Green, Rosetta Hightower, Neil Hubbard, Godfrey McLean, Alan Spenner, Lee Vanderbilt, Mike Woods

RIC GRECH BAND


I think that after leaving The Crickets, Ric tried to form his own band, but I don’t know details about it. Can anybody help me, please? I also know he tried to make a band with fantastic Spanish guitarist Ray Gomez, but I don’t know if both bands are really the same:

RIC GRECH BAND #?
?
Ric Grech †
bass, vocals
Ray Gomez
guitar
+ others unknown to me. Help!

KGB


KGB – from left to right: Carmine Appice (bottom), Ric Grech, Barry Goldberg, Mike Bloomfield (bottom), Ray Kennedy

KGB was a band formed in 1975, with great expectations, due to so much famous musicians being part of the project:

KGB #1
1975
Ray Kennedy
vocals
Mike Bloomfield †
guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Barry Goldberg
keyboards
Carmine Appice
drums

A really superb lineup. But, as many times happen, they hadn´t the success they deserved, and after their first album, KGB, Ric and Mike Bloomfield left the band.

Other info on members of KGB (I know up to 7 members)
To be covered (6): Carmine Appice, Mike Bloomfield, Barry Goldberg, Ray Kennedy, Ben Schultz, Greg Sutton

RIC GRECH BAND (again)


Ric Grech settled back in Leicester around Autumn 1975, and started looking at the local music scene. In December 1975, he started played his first gigs, with an existing band The Lentones:

RIC GRECH BAND #?
1975-1976
Ric Grech †
violin, guitar, vocals
Al Sansome
guitar
John Cusack
bass
Mickey Fleming
drums, accordion
+
Claire Hamill
vocals, sometimes
Mick Pini
guitar, sometimes

This line-up continued to play a number of gigs around the Midlands, sometimes being called The Ric Grech Band and augmented on occasion by a fine blues musician from Leicester, Mick Pini on guitar and the lovely Clare Hammill on vocals.

It is interesting to point out here that Ric never played bass here, only violin and acoustic guitar.

After a while, they changed the musicians and started adopting the new name Square Dancing Machine.

Other info on members of Ric Grech Band (I know up to 7 members)
To be covered (2): Ray Gomez, Claire Hamill

SQUARE DANCING MACHINE


Ric Grech renamed his band as Square Dancing Machine in June 1976:

SQUARE DANCING MACHINE #1
Jun 76
Ric Grech †
guitar, violin, vocals
Al Sansome
guitar
Mickey Fleming
guitar, accordion, vocals
Dave Seddons
pedal steel guitar
John Cusack
bass
Howard Coley
drums

After their first gig in June 1976 at Colchester University, Ric played the rest of the tour with the Leicester band Captain Video supporting him.

That tour resulted in a 2nd lineup of Square Dancing Machine, when the lineup of Captain Video joined Ric:

SQUARE DANCING MACHINE #2
1976
Ric Grech †
guitar, violin, vocals
Claire Hamill
vocals
Mick Pini
guitar
Tony Taylor
guitar
Les
pedal steel guitar
Mick White
bass
Howard Coley
drums

Claire Hamill joined them in April 1976. This lineup lasted just the summer of 1976, playing a mini-tour of UK, London, Leicester, Scarboro, etc.

They recorded one single, ´Ashes Of Love´, with The Who´s sound engineer Bob Pridden, but this was never released. After that, they split.

Other info on members of Square Dancing Machine (I know up to 11 members)
To be covered (1): Claire Hamill

DANNY PEYRONEL-DENNY LAINE BAND


Danny Peyronel was living in Spain at that time, and the band where he was, Banzai, was over, so he contacted Denny Laine (who had been previously living in Spain) to form a band. Denny surprisingly brought his former colleagues Ric Grech and Ginger Baker with him:

DENNY LAINE BAND #?
?
Danny Peyronel
vocals, keyboards
Denny Laine
vocals, guitar
Ric Grech †
bass
Ginger Baker
drums

And that happened in Spain! Unfortunately, the project went nowhere, when a Spanish producer tried to record them. Oh, so there will be some tapes from that project? That would be great!!

Other info on members of Denny Laine Band (I know up to 28 members)
Already covered (2): Cliff BartonBinky McKenzie
Old pages (2): Denny LaineDanny Peyronel
To be covered (14): Ginger Baker, Trevor Burton, Steve Holley, Andy Leigh, John Morshead, Jamie Moses, Gary Nuttall, John Pearson, Mike Piggott, Viv Prince, Andy Richards, Gordon Sellar, Steven Thompson, Ted Tomlin

AND THEN…


And I don’t know many more things about him till his sad death in 1990. Can anybody help me, please?

I include here some facts I´ve been reading along the years, related to Ric.

Around 1980, Ric occasionally sat in and jammed with Carl Shimmings´ jazz band that played on Sunday nights at the Old Horse Pub in London Road, Leicester. He only played violin as Carl played bass and led the band.

In October 1985, the band called The Rent (although billed as the Geoff Overon Blues Band on that occasion) was playing at the Phoenix Theater in Leicester on one of the regular Sunday lunchtime jazz sessions. Ric sat on violin for the last few numbers in the set, and this fantastic photo (courtesy of Graeme Malen) shows Ric, Geoff Overon on guitar and Graeme Malen on the drums, finishing the very last song.

The Rent (aka Geoff Overon Blues Band) – from left to right: Ric Grech, Geoff Overon, Graeme Malen – copyright of the photo: Graeme Malen


SOLO ALBUMS


Ric Grech has one album under his name, The last five years, but it’s not really a new album, but a compilation of songs where he played and mostly wrote (with Family, Blind Faith and Airforce).

This page is dedicated with my love to Ric. It was one of the first pages I ever wrote, back in January 1998. Many years have passed, and I still love Ric´s playing.


UNRELEASED PROJECTS:

  • Ric Grech played with The Rolling Stones in the sessions for their Beggars Banquet album, although he doesn’t appear in the finished album. In March 1969 he played in a different take of ´Street fighting man´ along with Jim King and Roger Chapman on backing vocals.
  • Still in The Rolling Stones sessions for their Beggars Banquet album, in May 1969, Ric Grech played violin in a variation of the song ´Factory girl´ along with Dave Mason. Other people attending those sessions include: Rocky Dijon (percussion), Marianne Faithfull & Anita Pallenberg (backing vocals), as well as Nicky Hopkins (piano). All produced by Jimmy Miller.
  • After leaving Family, Poli Palmer tried to form a new band with Ric, around 1972, but it didn´t work out.
  • In June 1973, the band Sharks, led by guitar genius Chris Spedding, recorded some tracks (some with Pat Donaldson on bass, some with Ric Grech), but sadly, they still remain unreleased.
  • In October 1974, Jimmy Page recorded a song called ´Scarlet´ with Keith Richards on vocals and guitar, Ric Grech on bass, Ian ´Stu´ Stewart on piano and Bruce Rowland on drums. It was never released.

DISCOGRAPHY: (59 albums known to me – Status: Completed)

OWN COMPILATIONS (1 credit)

    • The Last five years – Rick Grech (1973)

    • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood (RIP: Ric Grech)
    • Comments: Compilation of tracks co-written by Ric where he also appeared.

ALBUMS AS A BAND MEMBER (17 credits)

    • Scene Through The Eye Of A Lens / Gypsy woman (SINGLE) – The Family (10/1967)
      • Members: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Rob Townsend, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Producer: (RIP: Jimmy Miller)
      • Comments: This single (still credited to The Family) was not part of any Family album, but a CD reissue of their first two albums (Music in a doll house and Family entertainment) includes both songs as bonus tracks.
    • Music in a doll´s house – Family (07/1968)

      • Members: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Rob Townsend, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Guests: Mike Batt
      • Producer: Dave Mason (RIP: Jimmy Miller)
    • Family entertainment – Family (03/1969)

      • Members: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Rob Townsend, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Producer: John Gilbert, Glyn Johns
    • Blind Faith – Blind Faith (08/1969)

      • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Producer: (RIP: Jimmy Miller)
      • Comments: There´s a deluxe edition as a 2CD with additional tracks and long jams.
    • Airforce – Ginger Baker´s Airforce (03/1970)

      • Members: Ginger Baker, Remi Kabaka, Denny Laine, Steve Winwood (RIP: Graham Bond, Ric Grech, Jeanette Jacobs, Harold McNair, Phil Seamen, Chris Wood)
    • Airforce 2 – Ginger Baker´s Airforce (10/1970)

      • Members: Aliki Ashman, Ginger Baker, Bud Beadle, Colin Gibson, Steve Gregory, Denny Laine, Diane Stewart (RIP: Speedy Acquaye, Graham Bond, Kenny Craddock, Ric Grech, Harold McNair)
      • Guests: Rocky Dzidzornu
    • Rockin´ 50 rock´n´roll – The Crickets (1971)
    • Welcome to the canteen – Winwood / Capaldi / Mason / Wood / Grech / Gordon / Baah (09/1971)

      • Members: Jim Gordon, Dave Mason, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Comments: Recorded live in July 1971.
    • The Low spark of high heeled boys – Traffic (11/1971)

      • Members: Jim Gordon, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Comments: Some CD reissues contain 1 bonus track (co-written by Ric Grech and Jim Gordon).
    • Bubblegum, pop, ballads and boogie – The Crickets (1973)
      • Members: Glen D Hardin (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Guests: Pete Townshend
    • Remnants – The Crickets (1973)

    • Rainbow concert – Eric Clapton (09/1973)

      • Members: Eric Clapton, Jim Karstein, Pete Townshend, Steve Winwood, Ron Wood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech)
    • A Long way from Lubbock – The Crickets (04/1974)
    • KGB – KGB (1976)

      • Members: Carmine Appice, Barry Goldberg, Ray Kennedy (RIP: Mike Bloomfield, Ric Grech)
    • Rainbow concert (expanded edition) – Eric Clapton (July 1995) (LIVE)

      • Members: Eric Clapton, Jim Karstein, Pete Townshend, Steve Winwood, Ron Wood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech)
      • Producer: Jon Astley, Bill Levenson
      • Technical: Glyn Johns, Tim Young
      • Comments: Expanded edition of the original live album, with 8 additional, unreleased songs.
      • My opinion: Fantastic, love it!
    • BBC Radio volume one 1968-69 – Family (2004)

      • Members: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Rob Townsend, John Weider, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: This album contains live radio appearances from 1968 (6 tracks) and 1969 (10 tracks).
    • Live in Hyde Park – Blind Faith (09/2005)

    • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood (RIP: Ric Grech)
    • Comments: Live DVD recorded on the band´s debut in June 1969.

COMPILATIONS AS A BAND MEMBER (11 credits)

    • Old songs new songs – Family (1971)
      • Members: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Poli Palmer, Rob Townsend, John Weider, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Producer: John Gilbert, Glyn Johns, Eddie Kramer, Dave Mason (RIP: Jimmy Miller)
      • Technical: George Chkiantz
    • Winwood – Steve Winwood (1971)
      • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Spencer Davis, Dave Mason, Muff Winwood, Steve Winwood, Pete York (RIP: Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Guests: Brother James
      • Comments: Winwood is not really a new album, but a compilation of songs from earlier Steve bands, including Blind Faith or Spencer Davis Group.
    • At his best – Eric Clapton (1972)

      • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood (RIP: Ric Grech, Carl Radle)
      • Guests: Bonnie Bramlett, Rita Coolidge, Jim Gordon, Bobby Keys, Jim Price, Leon Russell, John Simon, Stephen Stills, Bobby Whitlock (RIP: Duane Allman, Delaney Bramlett)
      • Producer: (RIP: Tom Dowd, Jimmy Miller)
      • Technical: Howard Albert, Ron Albert, Chuck Kirkpatrick
      • Comments: 2LP compilation comprising tracks from Blind Faith, Derek & The Dominos and Eric´s first solo album, Eric Clapton.
    • Best of Family – Family (1974)
      • Members: Roger Chapman, Poli Palmer, Rob Townsend, John Weider, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
    • Backtrackin´ – Eric Clapton (1984)

      • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Yvonne Elliman, Jim Gordon, Albert Lee, Marcy Levy, Dave Markee, Jamie Oldaker, Henry Spinetti, Chris Stainton, George Terry, Bobby Whitlock, Steve Winwood(RIP: Ric Grech, Carl Radle, Dick Sims)
      • Guests: Bonnie Bramlett, Mel Collins, Rita Coolidge, Jim Fox, Albhy Galuten, Al Jackson, Leon Russell (RIP: Duane Allman, Delaney Bramlett)
      • Comments: 2LP compilation with tracks by Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & The Dominos as well as from Eric´s solo albums. Some of the tracks are live recordings.
    • Crossroads – Eric Clapton (April 1988)
      • Members: Ginger Baker, Bonnie Bramlett, Randy Brecker, Gary Brooker, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Alan Clark, Phil Collins, Rita Coolidge, Ray Cooper, Chris Dreja, Nathan East, Yvonne Elliman, Hughie Flint, Jim Gordon, Roger Hawkins, Tex Johnson, Bobby Keys, Katie Kissoon, Albert Lee, Marcy Levy, Dave Markee, Dave Mason, John Mayall, Jim McCarty, John McVie, Shaun Murphy, Andy Newmark, Tessa Niles, Jamie Oldaker, Sergio Pastora, Greg Phillinganes, Jim Price, Peter Robinson, Leon Russell, Paul Samwell-Smith, Henry Spinetti, Chris Stainton, George Terry, Bobby Whitlock, Steve Winwood, Ron Wood(RIP: Delaney BramlettDonald ´Duck´ DunnRic Grech, Carl Radle, Keith Relf, Dick Sims)
      • Guests: Brian Auger, Dave Bargeron, Ry Cooder, Bob Dylan, Jon Faddis, Albhy Galuten, Chuck Kirkpatrick, Leon Pendarvis, Robbie Robertson, John Sambataro, Stephen Stills (RIP: Duane Allman, Michael Brecker, Jesse Ed Davis, George Harrison, Peter Tosh)
      • Producer: Jon Astley, Giorgio Gomelsky, Glyn Johns, Bill Levenson, Phil Spector, Mike Vernon (RIP: Tom Dowd, Jimmy Miller, Felix Pappalardi)
      • Technical: Greg Calbi, Ken Perry
      • Comments: This superb 4CD box set (originally a 6LP set), contains lots of unreleased tracks, covering the whole career of Eric Clapton from their beginning in The Yardbirds, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & The Dominos, and his solo career.
    • Smiling phases – Traffic (11/1991)
      • Members: Rosko Gee, Jim Gordon, Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Dave Mason, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Barry Beckett, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Producer: Chris Blackwell
    • The Finer things – Steve Winwood (March 1995)

      • Members: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Spencer Davis, Al Di Meola, Karen Friedman, Rosko Gee, Jim Gordon, Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Brother James, Mike Lawler, Dave Mason, Paul Pesco, Jerome Rimson, Klaus Schulze, Michael Shrieve, Carole Steele, Pat Thrall, Muff Winwood, Steve Winwood, Pete York (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Barry Beckett, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Guests: Jimmy Bralower, Randy Brecker, Jack Bruce, Lew Delgatto, Steve Ferrone, James Ingram, Paul Jones, Remi Kabaka, Chaka Khan, Robbie Kilgore, Tom Malone, Eddie Martinez, Junior Marvin, Bob Mintzer, Rob Mounsey, Andy Newmark, Tessa Niles, John Robinson, Nile Rodgers, Philippe Saisse, John Sussewell, James Taylor, Joe Walsh, Willie Weeks, Mark Williamson, George Young (RIP: Dan Hartman, Andrew Love, Alan Spenner)
      • Producer: Chris Blackwell, Paul Buckmaster, Bill Levenson, Dennis Mackay, Russ Titelman (RIP: Jimmy Miller, Guy Stevens)
      • Technical: Phill Brown, Simon Heyworth, Andy Johns, Glyn Johns, Eddie Kramer, Tom Lord-Alge
      • Comments: The finer things is a 4CD boxset with songs from Steve’s long career. It features tracks by Spencer Davis Group (1964-1967), Eric Clapton And The Powerhouse (1966), Traffic (1967-1969 and 1970-1974), Blind Faith (1969), Winwood/Kebaka/Amao (1973), Stomu Yamash´ta´s Go (1976) and Steve Winwood solo albums (1977 to 1990).
    • Do what you like – Ginger Baker (1998)

      • Members: Aliki Ashman, Ginger Baker, Bud Beadle, Colin Gibson, Steve Gregory, Denny Laine, Diane Stewart, Steve Winwood (RIP: Speedy Acquaye, Graham Bond, Kenny Craddock, Ric Grech, Phil Seamen, Chris Wood)
      • Guests: Bobby Tench
      • Comments: Do what you like comprises the whole two Airforce albums (Airforce and Airforce 2), plus an outtake from 2nd album, and several songs from Ginger Baker’s album Stratavarious.
    • Feelin´ alright – the very best of Traffic – Traffic (2000)

      • Members: Jim Gordon, Dave Mason, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Chris Wood)
      • Producer: Chris Blackwell, Bill Levenson (RIP: Jimmy Miller)
    • Martin Scorsese presents the blues – Eric Clapton – Eric Clapton (September 2003)
    • Members: Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Hughie Flint, Jim Gordon, John Mayall, John McVie, Bobby Whitlock, Steve Winwood (RIP: Ric Grech, Carl Radle)
    • Guests: Chris Blackwell, Alan Skidmore, Phil Upchurch, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman (RIP: Johnny Almond, Ian ´Stu´ Stewart, Hubert Sumlin, Howlin´ Wolf)
    • Producer: Bill Levenson, Mike Vernon (RIP: Tom Dowd, Jimmy Miller, Felix Pappalardi)
    • Technical: Suha Gur
    • Comments: Compilation from the early stages of Eric Clapton´s career, including tracks by John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith or Derek & The Dominos.

ALBUMS WITH BANDMATES AND FRIENDS (13 credits)

    • Just for you / Little woman (SINGLE) – Dave Mason (1968)
      • Members: Dave Mason
      • Guests: Roger Chapman, Jim King, Rob Townsend, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: First solo single by Dave Mason. He´s backed in the B-side by the band Family (Roger Chapman / Charlie Whitney / Jim King / Ric Grech / Rob Townsend), as Dave was producing their first album at that time.
    • Thinking back – Gordon Jackson (1969)
      • Guests: Robbie Blunt, Rocky Dzidzornu, Luther Grosvenor, Remi Kabaka, Jim King, Poli Palmer, Julie Tippett, Steve Winwood (RIP: Jim Capaldi, Patrick Gammon, Ric Grech, Reg King, Chris Wood)
      • Producer: Dave Mason
      • Comments: Here we can find the original Traffic lineup: Steve Winwood, Dave Mason (also producing the album), Jim Capaldi and Chris Wood, plus members of Family: Ric Grech, Jim King and Poli Palmer. More great guests: Julie Driscoll (vocals), Luther Grosvenor (vocals), Robbie Blunt (sitar), and Remi Kabaka (percussion). CD reissue contains bonus tracks.
    • The Fence – Harold McNair (1970)

      • Members: (RIP: Harold McNair)
      • Guests: Alan Branscombe, Tony Carr, Terry Cox, Colin Green, Danny Thompson, Keith Tippett (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Producer: Sandy Roberton
      • Comments: This flute player was Ric companion in Ginger Baker’s Airforce, and played in lots of Donovan and Alexis Korner albums, plus some other albums from albums with members in my Olympus, like Steamhammer (Micky Waller), Cressida (with Iain Clark, the fabulous drummer, once in Uriah Heep). With Colin Green (guitar), Keith Tippett (piano), Ric Grech (bass), Tony Carr (drums), plus the rhythm section from Pentangle, Danny Thompson (bass) and Terry Cox (drums). He died soon after this album, in 1971.
    • Holy magick – Graham Bond (1971)

      • Members: Keith Bailey, John Morshead, Kevin Stacey, Diane Stewart, Steve York (RIP: Graham Bond)
      • Guests: Aliki Ashman, Pete Bailey, Annette Brox, Victor Brox, Alex Dmochowski, John Gross, Godfrey McLean, Jerry Salisbury (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: A great keyboardist and sax player, a pity he died back in 1974. This album features great players: his wife Diane Stewart on vocals, plus John Moorshead (guitar), Kevin Stacey (guitar), Steve York (bass), Alex Dmochovski (bass), Ric Grech (bass), John Gross (sax), Jerry Salisbury (harmonica), Keith Bailey (drums), Pete Bailey (percussion), Godfrey McLean (drums), Aliki Ashman (vocals), Annette Brox (vocals), Victor Brox (vocals). Some CD reissues contains 6 bonus tracks (others only have 2).
    • Hightower – Rosetta Hightower (1971)

      • Members: Ian Green, Rosetta Hightower
      • Guests: Colin Green, Bobby Keys, Henry Lowther, Henry McCullough, Jim Price, Bruce Rowland (RIP: Gordon Beck, Kenny Craddock, Ric Grech, Harold McNair)
      • Comments: Yes, she’s one of the female voices in the famous Joe Cocker hit ´With a little help from my friends´. She also sang in some other albums by Wendell Richardson (guitarist from Osibisa and Free), Yvonne Elliman, Kevin Ayers, Baker-Gurvitz Army, and she sang in some other album where Ric Grech appears. Rosetta also released her solo album, with Colin Green (guitar), Henry McCullough (guitar), Ric Grech (bass), the late Gordon Beck (keyboards, a long time Allan Holdsworth collaborator), Ken Craddock (keyboards), Henry Lowther (trumpet), Harold McNair (flute), Jim Price (trumpet), Bobby Keys (sax), Bruce Rowlands (drums).
    • Oh! How we danced – Jim Capaldi (04/1972)

      • Members: (RIP: Jim Capaldi)
      • Guests: Trevor Burton, Sue Glover, Jim Gordon, Bob Griffin, Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Jimmy Johnson, Mike Kellie, Sunny Leslie, Dave Mason, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Barry Beckett, Ric Grech, Paul Kossoff)
      • Comments: This album is Jim’s solo debut. It includes lots of friends. From Traffic: Steve Winwood, Dave Mason, Ric Grech, Rebop, Jim Gordon, Chris Wood. From Muscle Shoals: Roger Hawkins, David Hood, Barry Beckett (all three were to join Traffic sometime later), Jimmy Johnson (guitar). Plus some others, like Sue Glover & Sunny Leslie (vocals), the great Paul Kossoff (guitar), Trevor Burton (bass), Bob Griffin (keyboards), and Mike Kellie (drums).
    • GP – Gram Parsons (January 1973)

      • Members: Emmylou Harris (RIP: Gram Parsons)
      • Guests: Tom Bahler, Byron Berline, James Burton, Buddy Emmons, Glen D Hardin, Ron Hicklin, Alan Munde, Al Perkins, Barry Tashian, Ron Tutt (RIP: Ric GrechJohn Guerin)
      • Comments: This fantastic and fine musician sadly passed away in 1973, when he was only 26. He was a member of The Byrds, and later a founder member of The Flying Burrito Brothers. As far as I know, he only recorded two solo albums while he lived, GP and Grievous angel, but his legend grow immensely after his death, and like some other great names, his discography is still increasing nowadays. Ric Grech was a great friend of Gram, and that’s why he appears in his offcial albums, as well as in almost every collection of demos or outtakes.
        GP was Gram’s solo debut. With his then girlfriend Emmylou Harris, and some Byrds-related musicians, members of Elvis Presley band, and some other country-rock musicians, like Buddy Emmons (steel guitar), the great James Burton (guitar), Byron Berline (violin), Glen D. Hardin (keyboards), Al Perkins (steel guitar), Ron Tutt (drums), and John Guerin (drums). With a song written by Ric, ´Kiss the children´, who also co-produced the album along with Gram. It was recorded September-October 1972.
    • Grievous angel – Gram Parsons (01/1974)

      • Members: Emmylou Harris, Norman D Smart (RIP: Gram Parsons)
      • Guests: Byron Berline, James Burton, Kim Fowley, Emory Gordy, Glen D Hardin, Bernie Leadon, Herb Pedersen, Al Perkins, Linda Ronstadt, Ron Tutt (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Gram Parsons´ second album, Grievous angel features again Emmylou Harris, James Burton, Byron Berline, Glen D. Hardin, Al Perkins, plus Linda Ronstadt (vocals), Herb Pedersen (guitar), Emory Gordy (bass), Bernie Leadon (guitar, from The Eagles). There’s a song co-written by Ric and Gram, ´Ohh Las Vegas´. Ric is not credited in the album, but I think he must be there, just my guess… Recorded during Summer 1973. It contains a really superb rendition of ´Love hurts´, sung as a duet by Gram and Emmylou.
    • Chapman Whitney Streetwalkers – Streetwalkers (05/1974)

      • Members: Roger Chapman, Tim Hinkley, Charlie Whitney (RIP: Ian Wallace)
      • Guests: Jim Cregan, Mike Giles, Neil Hubbard, Linda Lewis, Godfrey McLean, Max Middleton, Poli Palmer, John Wetton (RIP: Boz Burrell, Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Ex-Family members Roger Chapman and Charlie Whitney put together a new project: Streetwalkers. The original idea was to keep the band as a duo (Chapman and Whitney). They recorded the first album, Chapman Whitney Streetwalkers, with several former companions in Family: John Wetton (bass, then in King Crimson, and later in Uriah Heep and many others great bands), Ric Grech, Jim Cregan, Poli Palmer, as well as Boz Burrell, Ian Wallace & Michael Giles (all from King Crimson), Tim Hinkley, Neil Hubbard and Max Middleton, etc.
        The album has finally reissued on CD in 2010, with a different album cover and under the title First cut.
    • Mahoney´s last stand – Ronnie Lane & Ron Wood (1976)

      • Members: Benny Gallagher, Ian McLagan, Bruce Rowland, Ron Wood (RIP: Ronnie Lane, Ian ´Stu´ Stewart)
      • Guests: Glyn Johns, Kenny Jones, Bobby Keys, Billy Nicholls, Jim Price, Pete Townshend (RIP: Ric Grech, Micky Waller)
      • Comments: This soundtrack, although it was released in 1976, was started to be recorded in 1972. Mahoney’s last stand album is credited to Ron Wood & Ronnie Lane. Ron and Ronnie are accompanied by many fellow musicians: Pete Townshend (guitar, from The Who), Ric Grech (bass and violin), Ian McLagan & Kenny Jones, Benny Gallagher (bass, from Gallagher & Lyle), and the late ones Ian ‘Stu’ Stewart and Micky Waller (drums), etc.
    • Sleepless nights – Gram Parsons – The Flying Burrito Bros (1976)

      • Members: Byron Berline, Chris Hillman, Bernie Leadon, Al Perkins (RIP: Michael Clarke, Sneaky Pete Kleinow, Gram Parsons)
      • Guests: James Burton, Emory Gordy, Glen D Hardin, Herb Pedersen, Ron Tutt (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Sleepless nights comprises unreleased songs from The Flying Burrito Brothers. Well, really, the album is credited to Gram Parsons & The Flying Burrito Brothers. Again, with Emmylou Harris, James Burton, Ric Grech, Byron Berline, Glen D. Hardin, Al Perkins, Ron Tutt, plus Herb Pedersen (guitar), Emory Gordy (bass), etc. And from The Flying Burrito Brothers: Bernie Leadon (guitar), Chris Hillman (bass), Sneaky Pete Kleinow (steel guitar), Michael Clarke (drums).
    • Eleven sides of Baker – Ginger Baker & Friends (01/1977)

      • Members: Ginger Baker
      • Guests: Louise Arthurworrey, Jeff Daly, Mike Deacon, Herbie Flowers, Kuma Harada, DeLisle Harper, Eddie Mordue, Alan Skidmore, Snips, Chris Spedding, Stan Sulzmann (RIP: Ric Grech, Ian Hamer, Derek Wadsworth)
    • Cosmic American music – Gram Parsons (1995)
    • Members: Emmylou Harris (RIP: Gram Parsons)
    • Guests: Byron Berline, Alan Munde, Barry Tashian (RIP: Ric Grech)
    • Comments: Cosmic American music is a compilation of demos recorded around 1972. Ric Grech appears here, as well as Emmylou Harris.

COMPILATIONS WITH BANDMATES AND FRIENDS (3 credits)

    • Warm evenings, pale mornings, bottled blues – Gram Parsons (1992)
      • Members: (RIP: Gram Parsons)
      • Guests: (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Warm evenings, pale mornings, bottled blues is a retrospective of Gram’s complete career, including his early bands.
    • Sacred hearts and fallen angels – the Gram Parsons anthology – Gram Parsons (May 2001)
      • Members: Jock Bartley, Emmylou Harris, Norman D Smart (RIP: Chris Ethridge, Gram Parsons)
      • Guests: Byron Berline, James Burton, Jon Corneal, Buddy Emmons, Emory Gordy, Glen D Hardin, Chris Hillman, Eddie Hoh, Bernie Leadon, Jay Dee Maness, Joe Osborn, Herb Pedersen, Al Perkins, Linda Ronstadt, Leon Russell, Barry Tashian (RIP: Michael Clarke, Ric GrechJohn Guerin, Kevin Kelley, Sneaky Pete Kleinow, Clarence White)
    • The Complete Reprise sessions – Gram Parsons (August 2005)

    • Members: Emmylou Harris, Norman D Smart (RIP: Gram Parsons)
    • Guests: Tom Bahler, Byron Berline, James Burton, Buddy Emmons, Kim Fowley, Emory Gordy, Glen D Hardin, Ron Hicklin, Bernie Leadon, Alan Munde, Herb Pedersen, Al Perkins, Linda Ronstadt, Barry Tashian, Ron Tutt (RIP: Ric GrechJohn Guerin)
    • Comments: 3CD comprising Gram´s two solo albums (GP and Grievous angel, plus a 3rd CD with rarities and outtakes.

SESSIONS (9 credits)

    • The London Muddy Waters sessions – Muddy Waters (April 1972)

      • Members: (RIP: Sammy Lawhorn, Muddy Waters)
      • Guests: Garnett Brown, Rosetta Hightower, Herb Lovell, Seldon Powell, Steve Winwood (RIP: Carey Bell, Rory Gallagher, Ric Grech, Mitch Mitchell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal)
      • Producer: Esmond Edwards, Ian Green
      • Comments: Muddy Waters arrived to London to record some sessions with avid British alumni. With some members of Muddy’s band, such as Sammy Lawhorn (guitar) and Carey Bell (harmonica). Great names here: Rory Gallagher (guitar), Ric Grech (bass), Steve Winwood (keyboards), Mitch Mitchell (drums), plus Rossetta Hightower on vocals.
    • Billion dollar babies – Alice Cooper (1973)

      • Members: Alice Cooper
      • Guests: (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Once I read that this album contains guest cameo appearances by Donovan, Marc Bolan, Ric Grech and Keith Moon, but my Spanish LP copy doesn’t have credits, so I can’t be sure. Can anyone check it for me, please?
    • Life in a tin can – The Bee Gees (January 1973)

      • Members: Barry Gibb, Alan Kendall (RIP: Maurice Gibb, Robin Gibb)
      • Guests: Jim Keltner, Tommy Morgan (RIP: Ric Grech, Sneaky Pete Kleinow, Jerome Richardson)
      • Technical: Ted Jensen
      • Comments: They were always great! This album contains their usual guitarist, Alan Kendall (guitar), plus guest appearances by Sneaky Pete Kleinow (steel guitar), Tommy Morgan (harmonica), Jerome Richardson (flute), Jane Getz (piano), Jim Keltner (drums). Ric Grech plays great parts of violin and bass in the song ´While I play´.
    • E H in the UK – Eddie Harris (1974)

      • Members: (RIP: Eddie Harris)
      • Guests: Jeff Beck, Neil Hubbard, Tony Kaye, Albert Lee, Zoot Money, Ian Paice, Chris Squire, Alan White, Steve Winwood (RIP: Loughty Amao, Boz Burrell, Ric Grech)
      • Producer: (RIP: Nesuhi Ertegun)
      • Comments: Eddie Harris was a jazz tenor sax player, who died in November 1996. Although mostly of his albums are really jazz stuff, he also tried a bit in the rock scene. This album is also known as The Eddie Harris London sessions. Ric Grech performs in only one song, along with Jeff Beck (guitar), Albert Lee (guitar), Steve Winwood (keyboards), Loughty Amato (percussion) and Ian Paice (drums). Other great musicians who appear in the album: Neil Hubbard (guitar), Boz Burrell (bass), Zoot Money (keyboards), and from Yes: Chris Squire (bass), Tony Kaye (keyboards) and Alan White (drums).
    • Men opening umbrellas ahead – Vivian Stanshall (1974)

      • Members: (RIP: Viv Stanshall)
      • Guests: Madeline Bell, Neil Innes, Gaspar Lawal, Derek Quinn, Barry St John, Steve Winwood (RIP: Rebop Kwaku Baah, Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech, Doris Troy)
      • Comments: The late Viv Stanshall was the leader in the Bonzo Dog Dadah Band. This was his solo debut, helped by Steve Winwood, who brought here his fellow companions in Traffic: Jim Capaldi, Ric Grech and Rebop. Plus Madeline Bell & Doris Troy (vocals) and Neil Innes (guitar, keyboard, from Bonzo Dog Band).
    • London revisited – Muddy Waters – Howlin´ Wolf (January 1974)
      • Members: (RIP: Sammy Lawhorn, Pinetop Perkins, Muddy Waters)
      • Guests: Garnett Brown, Rosetta Hightower, Herb Lovell, Seldon Powell, Steve Winwood (RIP: Carey Bell, Rory Gallagher, Ric Grech, Mitch Mitchell, Joe Newman, Ernie Royal, Howlin´ Wolf)
      • Producer: Esmond Edwards, Ian Green
      • Comments: London revisited is a collection of unused tracks from the 1971 sessions that Muddy Waters (4 tracks) and Howlin´ Wolf (3 tracks) made with British musicians.
    • Smiler – Rod Stewart (September 1974)

      • Members: Ian McLagan, Martin Quittenton, Rod Stewart, Ron Wood
      • Guests: Doreen ChanterIrene Chanter, Ray Cooper, Spike Heatley, Ray Jackson, Elton John, Kenny Jones, Andy Newmark, Dick Powell, Pete Sears, Ruby Turner, Willie Weeks (RIP: Ric Grech, Micky Waller)
      • Technical: Mike Bobak, Suha Gur
      • Comments: Smiler is Rod’s 6th album, with Ron Wood, Martin Quittenton (guitar), Micky Waller (drums), Pete Sears (piano), Kenny Jones (drums), Ray Jackson (mandolin), Ric Grech (here, playing violin), Spike Heatley (bass), Andy Newmark (drums, later with Roxy Music, Nils Lofgren, Roger Waters and countless others), Willie Weeks (bass) Ray Cooper (percussion), Elton John (piano and vocals in his own song ´Let me be your car´), Dick Powell (violin), Doreen Chanter (vocals) and the Memphis Horns.
    • Heyday – the BBC radio sessions 1968-1969 – Fairport Convention (1987)
      • Members: Ashley Hutchings, Dave Mattacks, Ian Matthews, Simon Nicol, Dave Swarbrick, Richard Thompson (RIP: Sandy Denny, Martin Lamble)
      • Guests: (RIP: Ric Grech)
      • Comments: Some CD reissue contains 1 bonus track. Ric Grech appears guesting on violin with the band in 2 tracks recorded in March 1969.
    • Live At The BBC – Fairport Convention (2007)

    • Members: Jerry Donahue, Judy Dyble, Ashley Hutchings, Dave Mattacks, Ian Matthews, Simon Nicol, Dave Pegg, Richard Thompson (RIP: Sandy Denny, Martin Lamble, Trevor Lucas)
    • Guests: (RIP: Ric Grech)
    • Producer: (RIP: John Walters)
    • Comments: 4CD boxset with live recordings by Fairport Convention. Ric Grech guests on violin in 4 tracks recorded in April 1969.

COMPILATIONS (SESSIONS) (5 credits)

    • The Chess box – Muddy Waters (1989)

      • Members: James Cotton (RIP: Francis Clay, Calvin Jones, Sammy Lawhorn, Pinetop Perkins, Willie Smith, Otis Spann, Luther Tucker, Little Walter, Muddy Waters)
      • Guests: Buddy Guy, Casey Jones, Sam Lay, Phil Upchurch (RIP: Carey Bell, Fred Below, Mike Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield, Willie Dixon, Donald ´Duck´ Dunn, Rory Gallagher, Ric Grech, Earl Hooker, Clifton James, S P Leary, Mitch Mitchell, A C Reed, Jimmy Rogers, Sunnyland Slim, Johnny Walker, Junior Wells)
      • Producer: Gene Barge, Esmond Edwards, Ian Green (RIP: Ralph Bass, Leonard Chess)
      • Technical: Greg Fulginiti, Bill Inglot
      • Comments: 6LP (or 3CD) boxset.
    • Over, under, sideways, down (a comprehensive collection) – The Yardbirds (1990)
      • Members: Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Chris Dreja, Jim McCarty, John McVie, Jimmy Page, Paul Samwell-Smith, Top Topham (RIP: Keith Relf)
      • Guests: Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, Louis Cennamo, Ray Cook, Aynsley Dunbar, Hughie Flint, John Hawken, Mike Hugg, Casey Jones, John Paul Jones, Paul Jones, Robert Plant, Jane Relf, Rod Stewart, Mike Vickers, Steve Winwood, Ron Wood (RIP: John Bonham, Ric Grech)
      • Producer: Giorgio Gomelsky (RIP: Mickie Most)
    • Reason to believe: the complete Mercury studio recordings – Rod Stewart (November 2002)

      • Members: Ian McLagan, Martin Quittenton, Rod Stewart, Ron Wood
      • Guests: Chris Barber, Madeline Bell, Maggie Bell, Doreen ChanterIrene Chanter, Ray Cooper, Mike D´Abo, Keith Emerson, Spike Heatley, Jimmy Horowitz, Ray Jackson, Elton John, Kenny Jones, Will Malone, Andy Newmark, Dick Powell, Martin Pugh, Andy Pyle, Harry Reynolds, Pete Sears, Danny Thompson, Ruby Turner, Willie Weeks (RIP: Speedy Acquaye, Long John Baldry, Ric Grech, Gordon Huntley, Ronnie Lane, Sam Mitchell, Micky Waller)
      • Producer: Bill Levenson (RIP: Lou Reizner)
      • Technical: Mike Bobak, Keith Grant, Suha Gur, Glyn Johns, Roger Wake
      • Comments: 3CD boxset comprising Rod´s first five albums (The Rod Stewart albumGasoline alleyEvery picture tells a storyNever a dull momentSmiler, plus several additional tracks.
    • Gold – Rod Stewart (July 2005)

      • Members: Ian McLagan, Martin Quittenton, Rod Stewart, Ron Wood
      • Guests: Doreen ChanterIrene Chanter, Ray Cooper, Mike D´Abo, Keith Emerson, Billy Gaff, Spike Heatley, Jimmy Horowitz, Ray Jackson, Elton John, Kenny Jones, Will Malone, Andy Newmark, Dick Powell, Martin Pugh, Andy Pyle, Harry Reynolds, Pete Sears, Danny Thompson, Ruby Turner, Willie Weeks (RIP: Speedy AcquayeRic Grech, Gordon Huntley, Ronnie Lane, Sam Mitchell, Micky Waller)
      • Producer: Bill Levenson (RIP: Lou Reizner)
      • Technical: Mike Bobak, Keith Grant, Suha Gur, Glyn Johns
      • Comments: 2CD compilation.
    • The Rod Stewart sessions 1971-1998 – Rod Stewart (October 2009)

    • Members: Carmine Appice, Rick Braun, Tony Brock, Phil Chen, John Corey, Jim Cregan, Paulinho Da Costa, Jay Davis, Joey Diggs, Mike Finnigan, Jeff Golub, Gary Grainger, Max Gronenthal, Dee Harvey, Duane Hitchings, John Jarvis, Danny Johnson, Chuck Kentis, Phil Kenzie, Nick Lane, Oliver Leiber, Robin LeMesurier, Linda Lewis, Steve Madaio, Ian McLagan, David Palmer, Billy Peek, Darryl Phinnessee, Martin Quittenton, Jimmy Roberts, Carmine Rojas, Kevin Savigar, John Shanks, Rod Stewart, Wally Stocker, Andy Taylor, Lee R Thornburg, Lamont Van Hook, Fred White, Ron Wood, Jimmy Zavala
    • Guests: Colin Allen, Kenny Aronoff, Jeff ´Skunk´ Baxter, Madeline Bell, Gene Black, Tim Bogert, Pete Carr, Valerie Carter, Doreen ChanterIrene Chanter, Michael Chapman, Ray Cooper, Lol Creme, Steve Cropper, Kevin Dorsey, Anne Dudley, Scott Edwards, David Foster, Albhy Galuten, Earl Gardner, David Gilmour, Bob Glaub, Richard Greene, Jimmy Haslip, Roger Hawkins, Spike Heatley, Gary Herbig, David Hood, Dann Huff, Clydene Jackson, Paul Jackson, Ray Jackson, Jimmy Johnson, Jimmy Johnson, Plas Johnson, Davey Johnstone, John Paul Jones, Kenny Jones, Jerome Jumonville, Suzie Katayama, Holly Knight, Joe Lala, Michael Landau, Patrick Leonard, David Lindley, Steve Lipson, Nils Lofgren, Nick Lowe, Steve Lukather, Eddie Martinez, John Mayall, Lance Morrison, Jamie Muhoberac, Andy Newmark, Patrick O´Hearn, Nigel Olsson, Richard Page, Sid Page, Bill Payne, Phil Perry, Lenny Pickett, John Pierce, Tim Pierce, Dick Powell, Guy Pratt, Jim Price, Andy Pyle, Frank Ricotti, John Robinson, Paul Robinson, Rick Schlosser, Tom Scott, Pete Sears, Leland Sklar, William ´Smitty´ Smith, Mark Stein, Neil Stubenhaus, Fred Tackett, Pete Thomas, Danny Thompson, Joe Turano, Ruby Turner, Carmen Twillie, Tommy Vig, Waddy Wachtel, Joe Walsh, Oren Waters, Willie Weeks, Larry Williams, David Woodford, Terry Young (RIP: Speedy Acquaye, Long John Baldry, Barry Beckett, Lyn Collins, Jesse Ed Davis, Donald ´Duck´ Dunn, Bernard Edwards, Ric Grech, Nicky Hopkins, Gordon Huntley, Al Jackson, Ronnie Lane, Sam Mitchell, Billy Preston, Tony Thompson, Micky Waller, David Williams)
    • Producer: Bob Ezrin, Trevor Horn, Danny Kortchmar, James Newton Howard, Lenny Waronker (RIP: Tom Dowd)
    • Technical: Mike Bobak, Dan Hersch, Andy Johns (RIP: Willie Mitchell, Dee Robb)
    • Comments: 4CD boxset compilation with lots of unreleased tracks.

RELATED WEBSITE LINKS: 28

Official site(s) – tell them you saw the link here:

From the always interesting Alex’s Picks (by Alex Gitlin), we have:

From the superb site Knights in Blue Denim: The British Blues Scene ’68 – ’70 (by Christer Fridhammar & Vanja), we have:

From the fantastic The British Sound blog (by Bruno Ceriotti), we have rock family trees about:

Wikipedia doesn´t want to include links to this website, but I won´t do the same with them. So, from the great Wikipedia, we have:

Assorted links:


RELATED VIDEO LINKS: 11
Disclaimer: I don´t own or upload any of the videos linked here. I just include links to live videos that are already available, in order to show the work of this musician. Anyway, if someone feels that some link shouldn’t be included, please write me at the email address shown below. And if you know of more videos featuring Ric Grech, please, also write me with the link.

 (Resolution: 360)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 240)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 240)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 240)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

 (Resolution: 480)

    • Featuring: Ginger Baker, Eric Clapton, Ric Grech, Steve Winwood.

THANKS:

Very Special Thanks to:

  • Danny Peyronel: for info on his band with Ric.
  • Mick White: for sharing his memories about Square Dancing Machine and Ric with me (2002).
  • Vince (Ozzy) Osborn: for info (2006).
  • Martin Osborn: for his fantastic message (2000).
  • Al Sansome: for info on Ric´s bands in 1975 and 1976 (2000).
  • Ian Whiteman: for info on the Olympic sessions (2002).

Special Thanks to:

  • Gareth Freer: for info (2008).
  • Mike Fitzgerald: for info on Farinas (2003).
  • John H Warburg: for lots of info on Ric, The Farinas and Family (2006).
  • Jaap Luif: for extensive info on Airforce and Denny Laine (1998).

Thanks to:

  • Alex Gitlin: for scanning album covers for me and help with support.
  • Henk Hagen: for info about Airforce.
  • Achim Schweikard: for offering his help with info (2010).
  • Jonathan Wheeler: for info (2009).
  • Donald Adler: for pointing an error in my page (but I still think Chappo was in The Farinas at the end) (2007).
  • Henry S Rosner: for info on Airforce (2005).
  • Jamie Kane: for his message (2006).
  • Stephen Robbins: for info on Ric playing with Fairport Convention in April 1969 (2002).
  • Neil Blunt: for info (2004).
  • Eddie McDonnell: for sending me the complete personnel list on Airforce 2 (2004).
  • Paul Hilling: for his message (2000).
  • Rev Millhone: for his kind message (2001).
  • Greg Willmott: for his message on Gram Parsons (2000).
  • Dave Kath: for his kind message (2000).
  • Stewart Mercer: for his very interesting message (2004).
  • Dave: for his message (2005).
  • Jeff Johnson: for his message on Ric and Gram Parsons (2001).
  • Kenny Parsons: for his message about Blind Faith (1999).
  • Michael Jardine: for info on Ric appearing in Gram Parsons´ 2nd album (2003).
  • Craig Meier: for his very interesting message (2001).
  • Jacek Szepan: for info on the bassist playing in Airforce 2 album (2006).
  • Dylan Thomas: for info on Ric playing with Johnny Rivers as well as some Crickets corrections (2012).

Also thanks for writing to:

  • William Ellis (2011), Robbie Grech (2007), Keith Lawrence (2006), Kevin Downes (2006), Blue Frank (2002), Janine (2005).

WHAT’S NEW:

22/May/2012 – Added another band (Johnny Rivers Boogie Band). Thanks to Dylan Thomas.
26/August/2011 – Page added to the blog.
16/January/1998 – Original page written by me (in the old site).


RELATED MUSICIANS:

Ric Grech mostly worked with these musicians: (name + number of credits)
Steve Winwood (24)
Ginger Baker (14)
Eric Clapton (12)
Jim Capaldi (11)
Dave Mason (11)
Jim Gordon (10)
Rebop Kwaku Baah (9)
Jimmy Miller (9)
Chris Wood (9)
Ron Wood (9)


Page created by Miguel Terol on: 16/January/1998 – Last modified on: 24/May/2012. If you want to contribute with info, please write to: molympus1@gmail.com


Please, note than you can check the indexes (musicians, bands, obituaries) at the top of this page.

3 comments:

  1. am not sure, but i think harry oevenall was the drummer in family on that 1st single, Scene thru the eyes of a lens/gypsy woman, soon to be replaced by rob townsend.

    Reply

  2. My dad Jeff Whitmore was the lead singer for Berkeley Squares and used to travel to their gigs with Grech. He also sang in Leicester bands Shelly, Reverbs and Tuxedo Five. Hope this helps……..

    Reply

  3. Hi, Jake – thanks for this. Is there any chance of getting more info about The Beverly Squares? The names of other members, for example, and the approximate period when the band was active. It’s not easy getting info about them. Thanks again.

     

Interview with Dave Andrews of Radio Leicester about iconic music venue “Il Rondo”

This is an interview by Dave Andrews of Radio Leicester with me, Shaun Knapp, and Sue Barton about the iconic music venue Il Rondo that is now a store room for an Italian restaurant! It was amazing to see it and realise it was still there virtually unchanged but rather derelict.

The Il Rondo hosted some of the greats of popular music including The Rolling Stones, The Who, Howlin’ Wolf, Fleetwood Mac and a host of others!

 

Heaven and Hell Coffee Lounge in Soho, W1 |Eric Lindsay

This is a brilliant blog post about the Heaven and Hell Coffee Bar in Soho written by it’s founder Eric Lindsay (link at end). Sadly not with us anymore. Check it out!!

Ray Jackson and I opened Heaven and Hell in late 1955. I had the idea from when I had been working in Paris, where there was a type of cheap cabaret called  “Ciel at l’Enfer” “Heaven and Hell” in Pigalle. The name and the place intrigued me, so later when I was in Paris again with Ray, I took him along to see the place and he also thought it was tacky but great.

The name stayed in my memory for a later date.

Here are some old photographs that I have just come across to show you how much the original impressed me. “Ciel et l’Enfer” was an intriguing name.

heaven-and-hell-old-postcard

heaven-and-hell-old-postcard-2

We had already sold the Regency Coffee Bar in East Sheen, which we opened with £200, £100 each, sometime in 1953. The Regency look was in, so we bought chairs from an antique shop in Putney for 5/- each and the owner of the shop taught me how to give them the antique look. We bought cheap floor covering, Ray’s uncle hung the wallpaper and my mother made the tablecloths and curtains. I used the same red Regency striped material to upholster the chairs, it was all a bit make do and mend, but the final result looked great. The major expense was the Gaggia Coffee Machine, which we paid off for. So espresso coffee came to East Sheen!

We thought we would do business, well forget it! I thought we would be stuck there for the rest of our lives. East Sheen was half way on the bus route between Hammersmith and Richmond, and really one should never get off the bus. I was convinced it was a place that people just stopped off to die. There was literally no business. Although everybody who lived there had the airs and graces of society toffs, they had no cash flow to buy a cup of coffee. In fact they hadn’t got a pot to piss in! But they lived in East Sheen so they had a little status. (They thought!)

Fortunately both Ray and I continued working in Theatre and TV, and Ray in films because we needed something extra to survive.

We were ‘so busy’ at the Regency that one person could run the whole place – serve coffee, do the cooking, the lot. So Ray and I worked alternate days. When I was on duty I would take an order and call out to the kitchen and then rush round talking to myself (the invisible chef). At least it was a good way to pass the time and it gave the customers the idea that we had staff.  I thought I was going to be stuck there forever.  We earned £10 a week each. My bus fares cost me £5, so you can see I was really in pocket! Finally we managed to sell the place to a guy who had retired from Claridges Hotel with a pension who wanted something easy to do in his retirement years. Well I could have told him that he wouldn’t be rushed off his feet here, but I didn’t and we sold the Regency for the princely sum of £1000, which was a profit, and we both breathed a sigh of relief!

We then started searching around for empty premises in Soho because I certainly wasn’t going out of town again. It had to be a shop and basement so that Heaven could be on the ground floor and Hell downstairs. We finally came across a little shop with a basement at 57 Old Compton Street. The ground floor had a small jewelry shop sharing the premises called of all things “Going Gay”.  Do you think it was an omen? The gentleman who owned the freehold was called Harry Shanson, and he owned all the freeholds of 55, 57 and 59 Old Compton Street W.1.

Shaws the estate agents who were handling  the property arranged for Ray and myself to see Mr. Shanson in his office in the City. Well, somehow it must have been our lucky day, because we talked to him and told him we were actors and what we wanted to do with the premises and the name we were going to call the coffee bar and the whole theme. He was interested in everything we had to say. Finally the question of rent came up and Ray and I nearly fell of the chairs when he told us what he wanted. It was far too much for us to afford. We got up to leave and explained that we just couldn’t afford to pay that sort of rent. He asked us how much we could afford. I told him half of what he was asking, to which he replied, “O.K.” With that, we both nearly passed out. Ray and I left his office floating on air.

We started work at 57 Old Compton Street. From the St. Martins School of Art we found a designer to make the plaster casts for the lights in Heaven and also Hell. Beforehand, Ray and I decided that Heaven should have an ethereal theme with sun flowers for lights with cherub faces. The staircase leading to Hell was a giant Devil’s mouth, which you walked down into. Hell was totally black with red flames climbing up the walls.

Out of the walls for lights we had these arms holding lighted Devil masks. The emergency exit, which we had to have, was a ladder in the middle of the room closed on 3 sides with a red curtain on which was a full length painting of the Devil with horns, tail and pitch fork. It was all very atmospheric and the customers adored it. On the street wall we had a light box with a colour transparency of Heaven and below it Hell. From the moment we opened, the place was full, at lunchtimes and evenings. I used to have to stand on the door letting customers in as a seat became vacant whilst they were queuing out in the street. Not many people wanted to stay in Heaven, they all wanted to go to Hell. No pun intended. As you may gather, business was fabulous, especially when the Soho Fair was on.

heaven-and-hell-soho-fair

heaven-and-hell-coffee-lounge-1-print

Over the years Harry Shanson and his wife became firm friends. He was one of the kindest people in the world. One day when we had been running quite a few years, Harry’s son, who was a bit of a monster when he was young, came in and said to me, “My daddy owns this place! It’s ours.” So I politely said to him “Fuck off!”

There was never a dull moment in Old Compton Street. The 2 I’s was next door. The customers would go from coffee bar to coffee bar. The 2 I’s used to have their windows smashed in regularly. We fortunately were left alone. Everyone seemed to making money and at 9 pence a coffee it was some hard going.

Two prostitutes in 1950s Soho

Prostitutes were on every street corner. The flat above Heaven and Hell was occupied by Suzy, an elegant French lady of the night who really would have been more at home in Mayfair, but I suppose she wanted a quick turn over! She wore the stair carpet out all the time. Next door at No. 57, Jackie, another French beauty, much younger than Suzy, could turn 100 customers a day. My mother, who used to come up to town regularly, used to sit in the window in Heaven and keep score. She was so intrigued by it all.

Well, the time came when Ray and I decided that we would like to get a flat together, so I spoke to Harry Shanson. The lovely  Suzy got her marching orders and Ray and I moved into Flat 1, 57 Old Compton Street at a rent that he asked us what we would like to pay, so that also was very reasonable. It was a known fact that he could always get at least double from the tarts. I did think she might send the ‘heavies’ in after being thrown out and when she found out that we had taken the flat, but no, she was always pleased to see me and talk when I saw her on her new beat at the corner of Greek St. and Old Compton St. Working ‘flats’ were not that difficult for the ‘girls’ to come by.

Suzy had kept the place spotless, after all she had he own French maid who was on duty full time during the working hours. The bedroom looked as though it had seen plenty of action. But after we had redecorated the whole place even Suzy wouldn’t have recognized it as her own little bordello.

We never had live music in Heaven and Hell, just two jukeboxes one in Heaven and one in Hell, with the same records in each. It was easier than all the hassle with live music because the customers never left. With us, they stayed about an hour and left, rather than sitting there all night. Also it was much more profitable as we would get loads of double plays from the 2 machines.

So the money rolled in and we were ready to roll out onto our next venture which was:

“THE CASINO de PARIS STRIPTEASE THEATRE CLUB”

P.S. If any of you ‘older readers’  happen to come across a picture of yourselves taken inside “Heaven and Hell,” I would be very happy to include it into my blog.

Source: Heaven and Hell Coffee Lounge in Soho, W.I. | ericlindsay 

The day Jazz fans had a riot |Telegraph

Beaulieu Jazz Festival 1960

As he looks forward to the A Love Supreme festival, Ivan Hewett looks back at the day in 1960 that jazz fans went on the rampage at the third Beaulieu Jazz Festival

Outdoor jazz festivals have an air of wholesome, clean fun. It’s hard to be cutting-edge when there are infants pottering about and midges biting. The ambience is best suited to trad jazz played by chaps of a certain age, dressed in ties and with bald pates reddening gently in the sun.

Next week something more ambitious and up-market takes place in rolling meadows in Sussex. This is the second instalment of Britain’s only green-field jazz festival, A Love Supreme, which is set against “the gorgeous backdrop of Glynde Place,” an Elizabethan Manor House. Top-flight acts including Gregory Porter, De La Soul, Laura Mvula and Dave Holland will be there. You can bring a tent, or go for a superior ‘Glamping’ experience complete with hot showers, Pamper Parlour and 24-hour security.

For those with very long memories, this might remind them of a somewhat less upmarket event more than 50 years ago, when some jazz fans went on the rampage in front of a similarly “gorgeous backdrop”. The year was 1960, the occasion was the third Beaulieu Jazz Festival, which took place at Lord Montagu’s estate at Beaulieu near the New Forest. Lord Montagu was something of a jazz fan, and thought this was a risk-free way to indulge his enthusiasm.

Unfortunately it all went wrong, when specimens of a new and puzzling sort of human being – the teenager – invaded the stage. Stuart Nicholson, now the distinguished columnist of Jazzwise magazine, remembers that as the lighting gantry collapsed “someone grabbed a microphone and demanded ‘free beer for the working man’.” A lone figure made it to the top of the stage, a converted merry-go-round complete with fairground horses, and once the crowd realised he was on television, a mass climb began to join him.” There’s some tantalisingly brief footage on this Pathé newsreel.

How wonderfully British. It wasn’t an end to bourgeois hegemony the young rioter was fighting for, or even more power for the unions. It was just some free beer. However the invader wasn’t some lone eccentric. Jazz at that time was a hotbed of competing styles, with deep antagonisms between different sets of fans. These were driven by class differences as much as musical tastes. The jazz historian Duncan Heinen has uncovered these simmering tensions in his fascinating history of jazz in the Sixties and Seventies, entitled Trad Dads, Dirty Boppers, and Free FusionG

The book shows that the 1960 Beaulieu festival was really more a tail-piece to the Fifties, that edgy decade of beatniks, CND marches, Angry Young Men, pop art, and race riots (it’s only because the Sixties have been so mythologised that people automatically think of the Fifites as drab). Jazz was in the thick of it, though witnesses of the period never seem to agree whether a fondness for drainpipe trousers meant you were anti-nuclear power and for modern jazz, or despised Dizzy Gillespie and preferred skiffle.

The jazz festival’s stage was a converted merry-go-round. Pic: GETTY IMAGES

Some say it was a working class thing to like modern jazz, and that middle-class rebelliousness came out in ‘jiving’ to trad. One indubitable fact is that the rock and roll, R&B and jazz scenes were closely interlinked, and players such as Ginger Baker could migrate from one to another. Look closely at this film clip of the 3rd Beaulieu jazz festival and you’ll catch a glimpse of a very young Rod “the Mod” Stewart among the eager crowds.

So with competing styles of jazz on the platform, plenty of beer on tap, and the provocative backdrop of a stately home, the stage was a set for a classic British class confrontation. One imagines some of the youth were just itching to feel aggrieved, like the character in Colin MacInnes’s novel Absolute Beginners, who describes the Beaulieu festivals as “garden party’s (sic) for the ooblies and Hooray Henries.” (According to the poet Jeff Nuttall, “ooblies” was Humphrey Lyttleton’s term for devotees of the “original purist trad subculture”. George Melly preferred the term “moron”).

Finding out what really happened that day at Beaulieu is like asking what really happened at the riotous premiere of the Rite of Spring. Some say it was the bearded trad fans versus the modern jazzers. Other say it was nothing to do with music at all. One witness insists it was Teddy Boys shouting “We want Acker!” (meaning trad jazz clarinettist and singer Acker Bilk), while the correspondent for Melody Maker sniffed about working-class “mobsters” coming from Portsmouth and Southampton. Once the stage had been invaded, chaos quickly ensued. A building was set on fire, 39 people were injured, and the BBC pulled its outside broadcast feed off the air six minutes early. “Things are getting quite out of hand,” said the announcer primly.

That wasn’t quite the end of the Beaulieu jazz festival. Lord Montagu was game enough to try again the following year, but the cost of the increased security meant the event was no longer financially viable. And that was it, for “green-field” jazz festivals in the UK – until Love Supreme came on the scene. More than 50 years on, will this stir the same passions? Will someone grab a microphone after Gregory Porter’s set and demand “free champagne for the working man”? Somehow I just can’t see it.

Source: The day Jazz fans had a riot – Telegraph

La Reverie Gypsy Jazz Band

Here are recent recordings and photos of La Reverie Gypsy Jazz Band. Recorded live on 22nd June 2017 at Rick Willson’s studio in Anstey, Leicestershire.
Guitars: Will Smith, Keith Pell
Accordion: Kenny Wilson
Bass: Mike Whittle

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Camille Paglia on the Iconic Cover of Patti Smith’s Horses | Literary Hub

Source: Camille Paglia on the Iconic Cover of Patti Smith’s Horses | Literary Hub

“THE MAPPLETHORPE PHOTO SYNTHESIZES MY PASSIONS AND WORLD-VIEW”

In 1975, Arista Records released Horses, the first rock album by New York bohemian poet Patti Smith. The stark cover photo, taken by someone named Robert Mapplethorpe, was devastatingly original. It was the most electrifying image I had ever seen of a woman of my generation. Now, two decades later, I think that it ranks in art history among a half-dozen supreme images of modern woman since the French Revolution.

I was then teaching at my first job in Vermont and turning my Yale doctoral dissertation, Sexual Personae, into a book. The Horses album cover immediately went up on my living-room wall, as if it were a holy icon. Mapplethorpe’s portrait of Patti Smith symbolized for me not only women’s new liberation but the fusion of high art and popular culture that I was searching for in my own work.

From its rebirth in the late 1960s, the organized women’s movement had been overwhelmingly hostile to rock music, which it called sexist. Patti Smith’s sudden national debut galvanized me with the hope (later proved futile) that hard rock, the revolutionary voice of the counterculture, would also be endorsed by feminism.

Smith herself emerged not from the women’s movement but from the artistic avant-garde as well as the decadent sexual underground, into which her friend and lover Mapplethorpe would plunge ever more deeply after their breakup.

Unlike many feminists, the bisexual Smith did not base her rebellion on a wholesale rejection of men. As an artist, she paid due homage to major male progenitors; she wasn’t interested in neglected foremothers or a second-rate female canon. In Mapplethorpe’s half-transvestite picture, she invokes her primary influences, from Charles Baudelaire and Frank Sinatra to Bob Dylan and Keith Richards, the tormented genius of the Rolling Stones who was her idol and mine.

Before Patti Smith, women in rock had presented themselves in conventional formulas of folk singer, blues shouter, or motorcycle chick. As this photo shows, Smith’s persona was brand new. She was the first to claim both vision and authority, in the dangerously Dionysian style of another poet, Jim Morrison, lead singer of the Doors. Furthermore, in the competitive field of album-cover design inaugurated in 1964 with Meet the Beatles(the musicians’ dramatically shaded faces are recalled here), no female rocker had ever dominated an image in this aggressive, uncompromising way.

The Mapplethorpe photo synthesizes my passions and world-view. Shot in steely high contrast against an icy white wall, it unites austere European art films with the glamorous, ever-maligned high-fashion magazines. Rumpled, tattered, unkempt, hirsute, Smith defies the rules of femininity. Soulful, haggard and emaciated yet raffish, swaggering and seductive, she is mad saint, ephebe, dandy and troubadour, a complex woman alone and outward bound for culture war.